Yearly Archives: 2018

PA – Two Deer on Blair County Hobby Farm, One on Lancaster County Breeding Farm Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease

06/08/2018

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today announced that three captive deer have tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania, bringing the total to 49 since the disease was discovered in Pennsylvania in 2012.

The disease was confirmed in two white-tailed deer on a small hobby farm in Greenfield Township, Blair County. These are the first CWD positives among captive deer in Blair County. The farm is now under quarantine.

A West Cocalico Township, Lancaster County deer also tested positive. The deer was among a herd that was euthanized after a deer tested positive in February 2018. It was the only positive result among 36 deer tested.

The department’s Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory in Harrisburg tested the deer, which were later confirmed positive at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa. The deer were tested as required by the department’s CWD program. Deer cannot be moved on or off these properties without permission from the department.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report no strong evidence that humans or livestock can contract CWD.

CWD attacks the brain of infected deer, elk and moose, producing small lesions that eventually result in death. Animals can get the disease through direct contact with saliva, feces and urine from an infected animal or contaminated environment.

Clinical signs include weight loss, excessive salivation, increased drinking and urination, and abnormal behavior like stumbling, trembling, and depression. Infected deer and elk may also allow unusually close approach by humans or natural predators. The disease is fatal and there is no known treatment or vaccine.

The infectious agent, known as a prion, tends to concentrate in the brain, spinal column, eyes, spleen, and lymph nodes. These high-risk parts must be properly handled and disposed of at the harvest location to prevent disease spread. Low-risk parts such as deboned meat, clean skull caps and capes present little risk and may be taken home.

The first cases of CWD in Pennsylvania were detected in white-tailed deer that died in 2012 on an Adams County deer farm, and wild, white-tailed deer in Blair and Bedford Counties.

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture coordinates a mandatory surveillance program for the disease for 860 breeding farms, hobby farms and hunting preserves across the state. Since 1998, accredited veterinarians and certified CWD technicians have tested more than 27,000 captive deer in Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Game Commission collects samples from hunter-harvested deer and elk and wild deer that appear sick or behave abnormally.

Find more information about Pennsylvania’s captive deer CWD programs, and the department’s broader efforts to safeguard animal health at agriculture.pa.gov.

MEDIA CONTACT: Shannon Powers – 717.783.2628

# # #

WI – DATCP Confirms CWD-Positive Deer in Marinette County

Release Date: June 18, 2018

Media Contacts:
Leeann Duwe, Communications Specialist, 608-224-5005
Bill Cosh, Communications Director, 608-224-5020

MADISON – The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) confirms that a white-tailed deer from a breeding farm in Marinette County has tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD). The National Veterinary Services Laboratory confirmed the test results and the farm has been quarantined. A quarantine means no animals may move in or out of the farm.

The two-year-old doe was born on the 230-acre farm and died during fawning. The fenced farm has 320 whitetail deer, according to the owner’s most recent registration. The farm had not been enrolled in the CWD Herd Status Program since May 2017. Previously, the farm was enrolled in the CWD Herd Status Program since 2002. More information about CWD testing requirements for farms enrolled and non-enrolled in the program can be found on the DATCP website.

DATCP’s Animal Health Division will investigate the animal’s history and trace movements of deer onto and off the farm to determine whether other herds may have been exposed to the CWD-positive deer.

CWD is a fatal, neurological disease of deer, elk, and moose caused by an infectious protein that affects the animal’s brain. Testing for CWD can only be performed after the deer’s death. For more information about CWD visit DATCP’s website. DATCP regulates deer farms for registration, recordkeeping, disease testing, movement, and permit requirements. To learn more about deer farm regulations in Wisconsin, visit DATCP’s farm-raised deer program. The Department of Natural Resources also provides resources for CWD and monitors the state’s wild white-tailed deer for CWD.

End of article.
Full article and location can be found here: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/WIDATCP/bulletins/1f848d9

WI – DATCP Confirms Chronic Wasting Disease at Depopulated Iowa County Deer Farm

DATCP Confirms Chronic Wasting Disease at Depopulated Iowa County Deer Farm
Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection sent this bulletin at 06/11/2018 08:07 AM CDT
DATCP Confirms Chronic Wasting Disease at Depopulated Iowa County Deer Farm
Release Date: June 11, 2018

Media Contacts:
Leeann Duwe, Communications Specialist, (608) 224-5005
Bill Cosh, Communications Director, (608) 224-5020

MADISON – The National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) confirmed that 21 whitetails from a deer farm in Iowa County tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD). On May 18, a team comprised of Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) and U.S. Department of Agriculture-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service veterinarians and animal health technicians humanely depopulated the farm’s 103 whitetail deer. CWD testing was done for 79 of those deer that were 16 months or older.

The deer farm had been quarantined since October when DATCP confirmed a deer shot on a hunting ranch in Waupaca County tested positive for CWD and was traced back to the farm. Since then, 10 additional deer harvested from the Waupaca County hunting ranch tested positive for CWD and were traced back to the Iowa County deer farm. State and federal indemnity payments are in the process of being determined.

CWD is a fatal, neurological disease of deer, elk, and moose caused by an infectious protein that affects the animal’s brain. Testing for CWD can only be performed after the deer’s death. For more information about CWD visit DATCP’s website. DATCP regulates deer farms for registration, recordkeeping, disease testing, movement, and permit requirements. To learn more about deer farm regulations in Wisconsin, visit DATCP’s farm-raised deer program. The Department of Natural Resources also provides resources for CWD and monitors the state’s wild white-tailed deer for CWD.

End of article

Full article can be found here: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/WIDATCP/bulletins/1f67719

IL – CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD) FOUND IN A CAPTIVE REINDEER IN NORTHERN ILLINOIS

SPRINGFIELD, IL – Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) has been identified in one reindeer in a captive herd in northern Illinois. Affecting cervids (members of the deer family), CWD is a prion disease that causes brain and nerve issues and has proved to be fatal. A prion is an abnormally folded protein that can occur naturally or be acquired through contact with contaminated bodily fluids or a contaminated environment.

Symptoms include weight loss, stumbling, excessive thirst, drooling, and listlessness. An animal cannot be diagnosed with CWD by symptoms alone, as many of these are also indicators of other diseases. The only definitive way to diagnose CWD is through tissue testing after death. There is no USDA approved live animal test available to determine if an animal has CWD.

The affected reindeer was sampled on April 23 during a necropsy after the animal died unexpectedly. Tissues for CWD testing were submitted to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for analysis and the diagnosis was confirmed at the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, IA on May 9. Samples were subsequently sent for DNA testing with confirmation received on June 5.

Prior to this detection, CWD had only been detected in one free-ranging reindeer herd in Norway in 2016. The susceptibly of reindeer to CWD had been much debated prior to this detection. This is the first known case of a reindeer being confirmed positive in North America.

The herd is a member of the IDOA’s Illinois Chronic Wasting Disease Certified Herd Program and has been placed under quarantine. The Illinois Department of Agriculture is working closely with the herd owner and USDA Veterinary Services to manage the herd.

There is no evidence of CWD being infectious to humans and it does not appear to naturally affect cattle or other domesticated animals.

Full article can be found here: https://www.agr.state.il.us/press.php?fn=chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-found-in-a–captive-reindeer-in-northern-il-2018

DATCP Quarantines Dane County Deer Farm and Richland County Elk Farm due to Positive CWD Results

Release Date: June 1, 2018

Media Contacts:
Leeann Duwe, Communications Specialist, 608-224-5005
Bill Cosh, Communications Director, 608-224-5020

MADISON – The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection has quarantined a deer farm in Dane County and an elk farm in Richland County due to chronic wasting disease (CWD). This is a result of the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, IA confirming on May 31 that samples from a 15-year old whitetail doe and a 2-year old elk cow were positive for CWD.

The 10-acre Dane County deer farm has six whitetail deer that have been registered with DATCP since 2003. The farm has been double-fenced since 2009. Since 2010, the farm has had 20 deer sampled for CWD.

Since March, the 20-acre Richland County elk farm has had 11 elk and there have been no elk purchases or sales on the farm in the past five years. Since 2007, the farm has had 25 elk sampled for CWD.

CWD is a fatal, neurological disease of deer, elk, and moose caused by an infectious protein that affects the animal’s brain. Testing for CWD can only be performed after the deer’s death. For more information about CWD visit DATCP’s website. DATCP regulates deer farms for registration, recordkeeping, disease testing, movement, and permit requirements. To learn more about deer farm regulations in Wisconsin, visit DATCP’s farm-raised deer program. The Department of Natural Resources also provides resources for CWD and monitors the state’s wild white-tailed deer for CWD.

End of article.
Article can found here: DATCP website