Hunting Trophies from Canada

The trophy prohibition from Canada as a result of the confirmed case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) applies to ruminants (including cervids) only. Bears, wolves, mountain lions, etc. remain unaffected. Completely finished trophies are also unaffected and are allowed unrestricted entry. With respect to ruminant hunting trophies, the following applies:

1. Meat – prohibited.

2. Antlers/racks – enterable: As personal trophies, hunters are allowed to import a maximum of 2 sets of antlers/racks (with or without the skull cap) as their personal trophy. Two sets can be imported without documentation. A larger number of antler/racks may be imported provided the quantity to be imported corresponds to the number authorized by a valid hunting license (or “tag”). For example, if the hunting license (or “tag”) authorizes 3 elk to be hunted, then the hunter may import 3 sets of elk antlers.

Please be advised that since ruminant meat is prohibited, the antlers/racks should be as clean as possible. USDA’s concerns are with large amounts of blood and soft tissue. Small amounts of soft tissue adhering to the trophy would not pose a significant risk (as seen with “field dressed” trophies). Customs Border Protection (CBP) inspectors (formally PPQ) at the port of arrival will inspect the trophy’s condition. If found to contain excess meat and tissue, it may be refused entry.

Please note: Commercial shipments of antlers/racks, skulls or other bony tissues are prohibited. However, combined shipments of antlers/racks and skulls that are the result from a group hunting expedition may be imported provided the number of antler/racks and skulls can be linked to the number of corresponding hunting licenses (or “tags”). There are no restrictions on the type of carriers used to ship trophies to the U.S.

3. Hides and capes (the part of the head & neck for the mount) – enterable: However, if the head still contains the brain or if there is still excess meat on the trophy, then the hide or cape would be prohibited. Once again, USDA’s concerns are with large amounts of blood and tissue. Small amounts of soft tissue adhering to the hide or cape would not pose a significant risk (as seen with “field dressed” trophies). Customs Border Protection (CBP) inspectors (formally PPQ) at the port of arrival will inspect the trophy condition. If found to contain excess meat and soft tissue, it may be refused entry.

For more information on BSE visit the APHIS website at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/bse/bse.html