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WI – DATCP Confirms CWD-Positive Elk in Sauk County

DATCP Confirms CWD-Positive Elk in Sauk County

Contact:   Bill Cosh, Communications Director, 608-224-5020, William2.Cosh@wi.gov

 

MADISON – The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) confirms that an elk from a breeding farm in Sauk County has tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD). The National Veterinary Services Laboratory confirmed the test results and the farm has been quarantined. A quarantine means no animals may move in or out of the farm.

The 5-year-old cow died while giving birth. The fenced farm has 15 elk, according to the owner’s most recent registration. The farm has been licensed since 1997 and is not enrolled in the CWD Herd Status Program. More information about CWD testing requirements for farms enrolled and non-enrolled in the program can be found on the DATCP website.

DATCP’s Animal Health Division will investigate the animal’s history to try to determine how it was exposed to CWD.

CWD is a fatal, neurological disease of deer, elk, and moose caused by an infectious protein that affects the animal’s brain. Testing for CWD can only be performed after the animal’s death. For more information about CWD visit DATCP’s website. DATCP regulates deer farms for registration, recordkeeping, disease testing, movement, and permit requirements. To learn more about deer farm regulations in Wisconsin, visit DATCP’s farm-raised deer program. The Department of Natural Resources also provides resources for CWD and monitors the state’s wild white-tailed deer for CWD.

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Article can be found at DATCP here: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/WIDATCP/bulletins/1f9ea1c

MO – MDC EXPANDS DEER FEEDING BAN TO MORE COUNTIES IN RESPONSE TO CWD

News from the regionStatewide

By Joe Jerek, Jun 12, 2018

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) has expanded its restrictions on feeding deer and placing minerals for deer to seven new counties in response to finding cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in or near them. The seven new counties are: Bollinger, Cape Girardeau, Grundy, Madison, McDonald, Mercer, and Perry. The feeding ban for these seven new counties becomes effective July 1.

These seven new counties join 41 existing counties of the Department’s CWD Management Zone where feeding deer and placing minerals for deer is restricted. The Zone consists of counties in or near where cases of the disease have been found. The 48 counties are: Adair, Barry, Benton, Bollinger, Boone, Callaway, Cape Girardeau, Carroll, Cedar, Chariton, Cole, Cooper, Crawford, Dade, Franklin, Gasconade, Grundy, Hickory, Jefferson, Knox, Linn, Livingston, Macon, Madison, McDonald, Mercer, Miller, Moniteau, Morgan, Osage, Ozark, Perry, Polk, Putnam, Randolph, Schuyler, Scotland, Shelby, St. Charles, St. Clair, St. Francois, Ste. Genevieve, St. Louis, Stone, Sullivan, Taney, Warren, and Washington.

According to the Wildlife Code of Missouri, the placement of grain, salt products, minerals, and other consumable natural and manufactured products used to attract deer is prohibited year-round within counties of the CWD Management Zone. Exceptions are feed placed within 100 feet of any residence or occupied building, feed placed in such a manner to reasonably exclude access by deer, and feed and minerals present solely as a result of normal agricultural or forest management, or crop and wildlife food production practices.

“CWD is spread from deer to deer and the potential for transmission increases when deer are unnaturally congregated,” said MDC Wildlife Disease Coordinator Jasmine Batten. “CWD can also spread when healthy deer come into contact with salvia, urine, or feces shed into the environment by infected deer. Placing feed and minerals for deer can facilitate the spread of diseases such as CWD. Recent research has confirmed the presence of CWD at mineral sites, which further supports this ban.”

For the seven new counties, MDC has also increased the availability of antlerless permits, and expanded the firearms antlerless portion to help harvest more deer in the counties and limit the spread of the disease.

MDC confirmed 33 new cases of CWD following the testing of nearly 24,500 free-ranging Missouri deer through its sampling and testing efforts last season. The new cases were found in Adair, Cedar, Franklin, Jefferson, Linn, Macon, Perry, Polk, St. Clair, and Ste. Genevieve counties. These new cases bring the total number of free-ranging deer in Missouri confirmed to have CWD to 75.

For more information on the feeding ban, visit MDC online at mdc.mo.gov/cwd under “Feeding Ban and Other Regulations.”

MI – First case of chronic wasting disease suspected in Jackson County

June 21, 2018

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced today that a 3-year-old doe in Spring Arbor Township (Jackson County) is suspected positive for chronic wasting disease. CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose.

Earlier this month, landowners in Jackson County contacted the DNR after a very ill-looking deer died on their property. DNR staff examined the deer to determine the cause of death and submitted tissue samples to Michigan State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. After initial tests were positive for CWD, samples were forwarded to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory for confirmation. The DNR is awaiting those results.

Over 31,000 deer have been tested for the disease since May 2015. If confirmed by the federal lab, this would be the 58th CWD-positive deer in Michigan and the first in Jackson County. Chronic wasting disease already has been confirmed in Clinton, Ingham, Ionia, Kent and Montcalm counties.

“We are committed to maintaining healthy Michigan wildlife for current and future generations,” said DNR Director Keith Creagh. “One of our chief goals is to slow the spread of chronic wasting disease to other areas of the state. That’s why we’ve taken strategic action, in partnership with local communities, hunters and others, to best address CWD in Michigan’s deer population.”

The DNR will be working with surrounding landowners, farmers, local governments and hunters to better understand this new finding.

“Strong public awareness and cooperation from residents and hunters are critical for a rapid response,” said Kelly Straka, state wildlife veterinarian. “We’d like to thank the individuals who called the DNR; without their help, we would not be aware that CWD may be within Jackson County.”

The DNR is asking for help from hunters and the public in reporting deer that are:

  • Unusually thin, lethargic, with drooping head and ears.
  • Exhibiting unusual behavior (for example, acting tame around humans and allowing someone to approach).

To report a suspicious-looking deer, call your local DNR field office or fill out and submit the online observation report found on the DNR website.

Although this latest finding involves a free-ranging deer, deer farms in the area will be notified as well.

“We are working with owners of deer farms within all counties touched by a 15-mile radius around the suspect deer to ensure they are meeting CWD testing requirements,” said State Veterinarian James Averill, DVM.

To date, there have been no reported cases of CWD infection in people. However, as a precaution, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that infected animals not be consumed as food by either humans or domestic animals.

More information about CWD – including Michigan’s CWD surveillance and response plan, fact sheets, and testing data – is available at michigan.gov/cwd.

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is committed to the conservation, protection, management, use and enjoyment of the state’s natural and cultural resources for current and future generations. For more information, go to www.michigan.gov/dnr.

End of article. Article can be found here: https://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-350-79137_79770_79780-471315–,00.html

PA – Two Deer on Blair County Hobby Farm, One on Lancaster County Breeding Farm Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease

06/08/2018

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture today announced that three captive deer have tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Pennsylvania, bringing the total to 49 since the disease was discovered in Pennsylvania in 2012.

The disease was confirmed in two white-tailed deer on a small hobby farm in Greenfield Township, Blair County. These are the first CWD positives among captive deer in Blair County. The farm is now under quarantine.

A West Cocalico Township, Lancaster County deer also tested positive. The deer was among a herd that was euthanized after a deer tested positive in February 2018. It was the only positive result among 36 deer tested.

The department’s Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory in Harrisburg tested the deer, which were later confirmed positive at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa. The deer were tested as required by the department’s CWD program. Deer cannot be moved on or off these properties without permission from the department.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report no strong evidence that humans or livestock can contract CWD.

CWD attacks the brain of infected deer, elk and moose, producing small lesions that eventually result in death. Animals can get the disease through direct contact with saliva, feces and urine from an infected animal or contaminated environment.

Clinical signs include weight loss, excessive salivation, increased drinking and urination, and abnormal behavior like stumbling, trembling, and depression. Infected deer and elk may also allow unusually close approach by humans or natural predators. The disease is fatal and there is no known treatment or vaccine.

The infectious agent, known as a prion, tends to concentrate in the brain, spinal column, eyes, spleen, and lymph nodes. These high-risk parts must be properly handled and disposed of at the harvest location to prevent disease spread. Low-risk parts such as deboned meat, clean skull caps and capes present little risk and may be taken home.

The first cases of CWD in Pennsylvania were detected in white-tailed deer that died in 2012 on an Adams County deer farm, and wild, white-tailed deer in Blair and Bedford Counties.

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture coordinates a mandatory surveillance program for the disease for 860 breeding farms, hobby farms and hunting preserves across the state. Since 1998, accredited veterinarians and certified CWD technicians have tested more than 27,000 captive deer in Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Game Commission collects samples from hunter-harvested deer and elk and wild deer that appear sick or behave abnormally.

Find more information about Pennsylvania’s captive deer CWD programs, and the department’s broader efforts to safeguard animal health at agriculture.pa.gov.

MEDIA CONTACT: Shannon Powers – 717.783.2628

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WI – DATCP Confirms CWD-Positive Deer in Marinette County

Release Date: June 18, 2018

Media Contacts:
Leeann Duwe, Communications Specialist, 608-224-5005
Bill Cosh, Communications Director, 608-224-5020

MADISON – The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) confirms that a white-tailed deer from a breeding farm in Marinette County has tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD). The National Veterinary Services Laboratory confirmed the test results and the farm has been quarantined. A quarantine means no animals may move in or out of the farm.

The two-year-old doe was born on the 230-acre farm and died during fawning. The fenced farm has 320 whitetail deer, according to the owner’s most recent registration. The farm had not been enrolled in the CWD Herd Status Program since May 2017. Previously, the farm was enrolled in the CWD Herd Status Program since 2002. More information about CWD testing requirements for farms enrolled and non-enrolled in the program can be found on the DATCP website.

DATCP’s Animal Health Division will investigate the animal’s history and trace movements of deer onto and off the farm to determine whether other herds may have been exposed to the CWD-positive deer.

CWD is a fatal, neurological disease of deer, elk, and moose caused by an infectious protein that affects the animal’s brain. Testing for CWD can only be performed after the deer’s death. For more information about CWD visit DATCP’s website. DATCP regulates deer farms for registration, recordkeeping, disease testing, movement, and permit requirements. To learn more about deer farm regulations in Wisconsin, visit DATCP’s farm-raised deer program. The Department of Natural Resources also provides resources for CWD and monitors the state’s wild white-tailed deer for CWD.

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Full article and location can be found here: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/WIDATCP/bulletins/1f848d9