CWD regulations in Alberta

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Alberta, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Alberta can be seen below:

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Most Recent CWD News

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  • We are making good progress on testing the heads submitted during the 2015/16 hunting seasons. But we still have about 900 yet to do. To date we have test results from 3921 heads and detected CWD in 74 deer (68 mule deer, 6 white-tailed deer;

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  • Hunters continue to play important role in disease surveillance

    Twelve new cases of chronic wasting disease have been identified in wild deer as a result of Alberta’s fall surveillance program. Hunters have submitted more than 4,800 wild deer heads for testing since September 1, 2009.

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  • The chronic wasting disease 2008 fall hunter surveillance program is winding down. As of January 7, 2009, Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development lab has completed tests on just over 3,000 heads. Individual hunters are notified of negative results when they are available through the Alberta

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  • EDMONTON - Twenty-four more cases of chronic wasting disease have been found in Alberta's wild deer, the Sustainable Resource Development of Alberta announced Tuesday.

    The results, from a 2007-2008 testing program, bring the province's count of the disease up to 53 cases.

    CWD affects the central

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  • Further efforts planned to maintain pressure against the disease.

    Edmonton... Twenty-four new cases of chronic wasting disease have been detected in wild deer along the Saskatchewan border, bringing the total number of cases in Alberta to 53.

    Alberta government staff recently held public meetings in

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Category Archives: Alberta

Intensive Control Efforts Find New Cases of Chronic Wasting Disease

Further efforts planned to maintain pressure against the disease.

Edmonton… Twenty-four new cases of chronic wasting disease have been detected in wild deer along the Saskatchewan border, bringing the total number of cases in Alberta to 53.

Alberta government staff recently held public meetings in communities most affected by chronic wasting disease. Discussions in Wainwright, Lloydminster, Oyen and Provost centred on the growing cases of chronic wasting disease, the results of the 2007-08 program and plans for the future.

“We know the work we are doing to manage this disease is hard on staff and the communities, but it is imperative that we continue to work together on chronic wasting disease,” said Ted Morton, Minister of Sustainable Resource Development. “We have seen this disease result in serious environmental and economic implications in the U.S., and we want to prevent this from happening in Alberta.”

In designated areas along Alberta’s eastern border, hunters are required to submit deer heads for testing, which is the first step of the Chronic Wasting Disease Program. In addition, submission of deer heads from identified areas west of the border is strongly encouraged. From last year’s hunting seasons, 5,170 heads were submitted and six mule deer and one white-tailed deer tested positive for the disease.

During targeted control programs in February and March 2008, Sustainable Resource Development removed and tested 3,406 wild deer resulting in detecting 15 mule deer and two white-tailed deer with the disease. The data indicate that the control program is having an effect in limiting further spread of the disease.

Fifty-three cases of chronic wasting disease in wild deer have been detected since 2005. Of those, one was found sick, 12 were collected by hunters and 40 were collected during the control programs.

Hunters and landowners in Alberta along the Saskatchewan border are important players in chronic wasting disease management. The primary goal is to decrease the overabundant deer populations in high risk areas. All hunters and landowners are encouraged to take full advantage of hunting opportunities throughout the border area for 2008-09. For draw information, visit www.mywildalberta.com/Home/Hunting/HuntingDraws.aspx .

Chronic wasting disease affects the nervous system and causes infected animals to slowly waste away. There is no evidence the disease affects humans. As a precaution, the World Health Organization advises against allowing into the human food system any products from animals known to be infected with any prion disease such as chronic wasting disease and BSE. For further information, visit srd.alberta.ca

Testing Completed for Chronic Wasting Disease Winter Program – Nine more cases found in Alberta’s wild deer

Edmonton… Alberta’s chronic wasting disease control program has identified nine additional infected deer out of more than 1,400 collected from the final winter target area in east-central Alberta.

Between March 15 and 27, 600 mule deer and 801 white-tailed deer were collected from high-risk areas east of Wainwright, near Edgerton and Chauvin. The disease was confirmed in eight mule deer and one white-tailed deer. These new cases are in addition to the three positive deer confirmed near the Empress area from 449 deer collected earlier in March. This brings the total of positive cases of chronic wasting disease in wild deer to 29 since the first documented case in September 2005.

Because Edgerton is the most westerly point at which the disease has been found, reduction of deer populations near Edgerton is an important control measure. With the Canadian Forces Base and the Wainwright Dunes Ecological Reserve in close proximity, large numbers of deer and elk are at risk if the disease becomes established.

Surveillance for this disease largely involves testing of hunter-killed deer in disease-control areas during the fall hunting season. During the 2006-2007 hunting season, 3,000 deer were tested, and four mule deer tested positive. These positive cases led to the additional disease control response this winter. Staff from Sustainable Resource Development worked with the department of Agriculture and Food to test the wild deer.

Chronic wasting disease affects the nervous system, causing infected animals to lose weight and slowly waste away. There is no scientific evidence to suggest the disease can affect humans. As a precaution, the World Health Organization advises against allowing products from animals known to be infected with any prion (abnormal protein) disease, such as chronic wasting disease and BSE, into the human food system.

Expanded Chronic Wasting Disease Testing Discovers Three More Cases: Results include Alberta’s first case in white-tailed deer

Edmonton: As a result of the provincial wildlife disease response program, three more wild deer in the Empress area of Alberta have been confirmed positive for chronic wasting disease. The additional testing was required for high-risk, disease-control areas due to the detection of several earlier cases of chronic wasting disease.

From March 5 to 9, a total of 169 mule deer and 280 white-tailed deer was collected from high-risk areas in the Red Deer and South Saskatchewan river valleys near Empress. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency confirmed two mule deer and one white-tailed deer were positive for chronic wasting disease. This brings the total positive wild deer in Alberta to 20 cases since the first documented case in September 2005. This total may increase when testing is completed for the additional 1,401 deer collected in the Chauvin region.

Surveillance for the disease largely involves testing of hunter-killed deer in disease control areas during the fall hunting season. During the 2006-2007 hunting season, 3,000 deer and elk were tested, and four mule deer tested positive for chronic wasting disease. These positive cases led to this additional provincial disease control response in the Chauvin and Empress areas.

Chronic wasting disease is a nervous system disease where infected animals cannot maintain weight and slowly waste away. There is no scientific evidence to suggest the disease can affect humans. As a precaution, the World Health Organization advises against allowing products from animals known to be infected with any prion disease such as chronic wasting disease and BSE, into the human food system.

New Cases of Chronic Wasting Disease Found in Wild Deer

Hunters and landowners help surveillance program

Edmonton… Alberta is now about half-way through testing for its 2006-07 chronic wasting disease (CWD) surveillance program. Three more cases of CWD in wild deer have been confirmed out of the 1,609 deer tested. This brings the total to 16 cases in wild deer in Alberta since the first case in September 2005.

The three new cases involve deer taken during the recent hunting season in areas being monitored for the disease by Sustainable Resource Development, Fish and Wildlife staff. A male mule deer from along the Red Deer River (wildlife management unit [WMU] 151) tested positive for the disease. Two female mule deer were taken west of Edgerton and south of Chauvin (in WMU 234).

One of these animals came from near previously known Alberta cases. The other two came from a high-risk area near Saskatchewan where positive wild and farmed deer have been found. Two of these latest cases were confirmed December 8, and the third (near Chauvin) on December 20. Hunters and landowners have played a critical role in the success of the CWD control program. Many Alberta hunters have participated in the quota hunts, and landowners have allowed additional hunting on their property. Most seasons are closed now in the target areas, with the final licence season ending on January 15, 2007.

Hunters are reminded that submitting deer heads is a requirement in five wildlife management units along the Alberta/Saskatchewan border. These include WMUs 150, 151, 234, 256, and 500. Any heads taken in these areas and kept frozen since the animal was shot can still be dropped off at a Fish and Wildlife office or at one of the 24-hour freezers. Maps and information are posted at www.srd.gov.ab.ca/fw/diseases.

Chronic wasting disease affects the nervous system; infected animals cannot maintain weight and slowly waste away. There is no scientific evidence to suggest that CWD can infect humans. As a precaution, the World Health Organization advises against allowing products from animals known to be infected with CWD into the human food system. The three hunters have been contacted and were offered various alternatives including a replacement tag or replacement meat.

Map found here (PDF).

For further information visit website at http://www.srd.gov.ab.ca/fw/diseases/.

Media enquiries may be directed to: Lyle Fullerton Fish and Wildlife Alberta Sustainable Resource Development Peace River Phone: (780) 624-6496; cell 625-8044

Dave Ealey Communications Alberta Sustainable Resource Development Edmonton Phone: (780) 427-8636 To call toll-free within Alberta dial 310-0000.

New 2006 Positives

Alberta has recorded two more cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in wild deer after hunters recently turned in the heads for testing. This brings the total to 15 cases of CWD confirmed in wild deer in Alberta since the first case in September 2005.

The two new cases involve deer harvested during the recent hunting season in areas monitored for CWD. A male mule deer from wildlife management unit (WMU) 151 along the Red Deer River tested positive. As well, a female mule deer was taken in WMU 234, west of Edgerton. The first case was near previously known cases; the second case occurred in a high-risk area next to a part of Saskatchewan where positive wild and farmed deer have been found. These latest cases were confirmed December 8.

A total of 914 deer heads have been sampled from the 2006 hunting season to December 8 and testing continues on the remaining heads.

Hunters are reminded that submission of deer heads is a requirement in five wildlife management units along the Alberta/Saskatchewan border. These include WMU 150, 151, 234, 256, and 500. Any heads taken in these areas and kept frozen since the animal was shot can still be dropped off at a Fish and Wildlife office or at one of the 24-hour freezers.

View map of new positives.