CWD regulations in Arkansas

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Arkansas, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Arkansas can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Arkansas

Sorry, our records do not show any CWD testing laboratories in your state, if you find this to be in error, please contact us.

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 2/2016)

Benton, Boone, Carroll, Madison, Marion, Newton, Pope, Searcy, Sebastian and Washington counties

Most Recent CWD News

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  • LITTLE ROCK – Chronic wasting disease, detected in Arkansas almost two years ago, has been found in three more counties. Four white-tailed deer in Benton, Washington and Sebastian counties recently tested positive for the deadly disease, according to the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

    The deer

    Read More
  • JASPER – Six more deer from the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s chronic wasting disease sampling effort have turned up positive, according to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Madison. This brings the total of CWD-positive cases of Arkansas deer and elk to 56.

    All six

    Read More
  • LITTLE ROCK – The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has received 27 more positive cases of chronic wasting disease from a recent batch of samples taken in northern Newton County. This brings the total number of CWD-positive deer and elk cases in Arkansas to 50.

    Although
    Read More
  • LITTLE ROCK – Bad news continues to roll in from north Arkansas amid the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s efforts to find the prevalence rate of chronic wasting disease in the area where the disease initially was detected. Results from last week’s tests revealed an additional

    Read More
  • LITTLE ROCK – A second white-tailed deer has tested positive for chronic wasting disease, according to the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. The disease is fatal to deer and elk.

    The second positive CWD test came from a deer north of Mt. Sherman at Camp Orr.

    Read More
  • LITTLE ROCK – A white-tailed deer in Ponca recently tested positive for chronic wasting disease, according to the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. The disease is fatal to deer and elk.

    The positive CWD test from a deer comes on the heels of an elk near
    Read More
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Category Archives: Arkansas

CWD confirmed in three northwest Arkansas counties

LITTLE ROCK – Chronic wasting disease, detected in Arkansas almost two years ago, has been found in three more counties. Four white-tailed deer in Benton, Washington and Sebastian counties recently tested positive for the deadly disease, according to the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission.

The deer in Benton County were a 2½-year-old doe near Decatur and a 5½-year-old doe near Springtown. The Sebastian County deer was an adult buck near Lavaca, and the one from Washington County was a 1½-year-old buck near Prairie Grove. All four were harvested by hunters during the 2017-18 deer season, and confirmed as CWD-positive by the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Madison.

Test results have not been received for all samples that have been collected; it’s possible more deer and elk could test positive for the disease. Since these positive samples were detected outside the current CWD Management Zone, the AGFC will continue their review to ensure all information is accurate.

“Although CWD is a serious threat to Arkansas’s elk and white-tailed deer, we are not the first to deal with the disease,” AGFC Director Pat Fitts said. “Our staff is prepared and, with help from the public, will respond with effective measures. We have learned from the experiences of 23 other states.”

CWD was first detected in Arkansas Feb. 23, 2016, when a hunter-harvested elk in Newton County tested positive. The first Arkansas deer with CWD was verified March 3, 2016, also in Newton County.

Public meetings in the area will be scheduled as forums to discuss plans and to answer questions.

CWD was first documented among captive mule deer in Colorado in 1967, and has been detected in 24 states and two Canadian provinces. It’s been found in the wild in 20 states and among captive cervids in 15 states.

The Commission has taken several steps to prevent the disease, which strikes cervids (deer, elk and moose), from entering the state. A moratorium on live cervid importation began in 2002, and the importation of cervid carcasses was banned in 2005. Moratoriums on permits for commercial hunting resorts and breeder/dealer permits for cervid facilities were put in place in 2006. Capturing white-tailed deer by hand was banned in 2012.

According to the CWD Alliance, the disease was discovered among captive mule deer in Colorado in 1967, and has been detected in 24 other states and two Canadian provinces. Biologists believe a protein particle called a prion is transmitted through feces, urine and saliva, and can survive for years in soil and plants. CWD can have an incubation period of at least 16 months, which means infected animals may not show symptoms immediately.

CWD affects an animal’s nervous system. Prions transform normal cellular proteins into abnormal shapes that accumulate until neural cells cease to function. Infected animals begin to lose weight, lose their appetite and develop an insatiable thirst. They tend to separate from their herds, walk in repetitive patterns, carry their head low, salivate, urinate frequently and grind their teeth.

Visit ArkansasCWD.com for more information.

Six more cases of CWD found in Newton County

JASPER – Six more deer from the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s chronic wasting disease sampling effort have turned up positive, according to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Madison. This brings the total of CWD-positive cases of Arkansas deer and elk to 56.

All six deer that tested positive came from Newton County inside the sampling focal area. The final results from the intensive sampling effort should be available late next week.

Although a true prevalence rate cannot be determined until the last of the samples come in, the high number of positive results has already prompted a second sampling effort to determine whether the disease is present in other parts of the state. AGFC biologists and wildlife officers will begin collecting samples from road-killed deer and any sick or dead deer reported throughout Arkansas.

Anyone who witnesses a sick, dead or road-killed deer or elk should contact the AGFC’s radio room at 800-482-9262. Operators are available 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Reports will be sent to the appropriate person to collect samples.

Deer or elk infected with CWD tend to stay away from herds, may lose their fear of humans, walk in patterns, carry their head low, salivate excessively and grind their teeth. As the disease progresses, the animal will lose weight, develop an insatiable thirst and lose bodily functions.

The AGFC is holding weekly public meetings at Carroll Electric Cooperative, 511 E. Court St. in Jasper to update the public on the results from its sampling efforts. The next meeting will be at 11 a.m., April 7. Visit www.agfc.com/cwd for more information.

Chronic wasting disease results climb to 50

LITTLE ROCK – The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has received 27 more positive cases of chronic wasting disease from a recent batch of samples taken in northern Newton County. This brings the total number of CWD-positive deer and elk cases in Arkansas to 50.

Although the intensive sampling effort to determine prevalence has been halted, many results from that effort are still pending.

“The samples that already have been taken should give us a good indication of the prevalence of CWD in the area,” said Brad Carner, chief of the AGFC’s Wildlife Management Division.

Carner says the last batch of 110 samples should arrive late next week. Samples collected from deer are sent to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Madison. The elk samples are going to the Colorado State University Prion Research Center in Fort Collins. So far, three of the elk samples have been found to be positive for CWD.

Some CWD-positive samples came from dead or sick deer found outside the original sampling zone. This has prompted a second phase of sampling to begin on a much larger scale.

“Since it was found outside our original focal area, we need to see just how far the disease has spread,” said Cory Gray, AGFC deer program coordinator. “We will need the public’s help more than ever for this next phase of testing.”

Gray says the AGFC will take samples from any sick or dead deer reported throughout the state. A primary focus will be on road-killed animals.

“Samples taken from road kills have a greater chance of testing positive than random samples from healthy animals,” Gray said. “The presence of CWD can only be determined within a day or two of the animal’s death, so we need the public to call in and report any road-killed deer as soon as they see it.”

This second phase of testing will continue until at least May 20. Any person witnessing a sick or dead deer or elk should contact the AGFC’s radio room at 800-482-9262. Operators are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

CWD is a neurological disease that’s part of a group of diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Once in a host’s body, prions transform normal cellular protein into abnormal shapes that accumulate until the cell ceases to function. As the brains of infected animals degenerate, they lose weight, lose their appetite and develop an insatiable thirst. They tend to stay away from herds, walk in patterns, carry their head low, salivate and grind their teeth.

The AGFC is holding weekly public meetings at Carroll Electric Cooperative, 511 E. Court St. in Jasper. The next meeting will be at 11 a.m., April 7.

Visit www.agfc.com/cwd for more information.

First batch of target tests reveals 19 additional CWD-positive cervids

LITTLE ROCK – Bad news continues to roll in from north Arkansas amid the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s efforts to find the prevalence rate of chronic wasting disease in the area where the disease initially was detected. Results from last week’s tests revealed an additional 18 deer and a single elk with the disease.

Last week, tissue samples from 49 deer and elk taken in and around the 125,000-acre focal area were sent to the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Madison for testing. Out of the 18 positive deer samples, four were found just outside of the AGFC’s focal area. Those deer were either found dead or were killed by vehicles. The single cow elk was taken from the Boxley Valley area of Newton County.

Arkansas now has 22 CWD positive samples from the state’s deer and elk. Before today’s lab results, two deer and an elk had tested positive for the fatal disease. All three of those initially tested cervids came from within Newton County. Today’s test results included 17 positive samples from Newton County and two deer from Boone County.

The first animal in Arkansas confirmed to have CWD was a 2½-year-old female elk. The elk was killed by a hunter Oct. 6 on the Buffalo National River near Pruitt during elk season. The disease was confirmed on Feb. 23.
As of today, more than 260 deer and 18 elk have been taken for sampling. Another large batch of samples is currently at the Wisconsin lab with results expected late next week.

The AGFC will continue its efforts to sample elk that appear to be sick from throughout the known elk range. Due to the large number of positive samples, including samples outside the established focal area, emphasis will be placed on collecting samples from road-killed deer and sick or dead deer throughout northwest Arkansas in order to determine the extent of the disease’s distribution.

The latest test results were a blow to AGFC Chief of Wildlife Management Brad Carner. “This is not good news. We were hopeful that all positive samples would be contained within our focal area. That’s obviously not the case,” he said. “We also hoped to find a low prevalence rate in the test samples. We’re disappointed, but still focused on the job at hand,” Carner noted.

Landowners continue to be very helpful in allowing the AGFC access to their property, Carner says. “Much of the land within the zone where the agency is working is privately owned. We continue to ask for their help and help from anyone who sees a deer or elk that appears to be ill.”

The public can report sick deer and elk by calling 800-482-9262 or by email at [email protected], 24 hours a day.

Although there are no confirmed cases of CWD transmission from cervids to humans or to livestock, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the Arkansas Department of Health recommend that people not consume meat from animals known to be infected with CWD.

The AGFC is holding weekly public meetings in Jasper at Carroll Electric, 511 E Court St. The next meetings will be held March 24, 31 and April 7 beginning at 11 a.m.

Visit www.agfc.com/cwd for more information.

Arkansas: Third case of chronic wasting disease confirmed near Mt. Sherman

LITTLE ROCK – A second white-tailed deer has tested positive for chronic wasting disease, according to the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. The disease is fatal to deer and elk.

The second positive CWD test came from a deer north of Mt. Sherman at Camp Orr. The AGFC took tissue samples from the 4½-year-old female deer, which was found dead on March 2. The Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Madison, confirmed the test late Monday. Earlier this month, another deer was found dead in Ponca. That deer also tested positive for CWD.

The two deer are in addition to an elk killed during a hunt near Pruitt, which was confirmed to have the disease Feb. 23. All three locations are in northern Newton County near the Buffalo River.

The 2½-year-old female elk was killed by a hunter Oct. 6 on the Buffalo National River near Pruitt during elk hunting season. It was the first animal in Arkansas confirmed to have CWD. The disease was confirmed on Feb. 23. The elk was tested by the same lab that confirmed CWD in the deer from Ponca.

To determine the prevalence and distribution of the disease among deer, the AGFC has begun taking samples within a capsule-shaped area ranging from 5 miles west of Ponca to 5 miles east of Pruitt, and 5 miles across.

The dead deer found near Mt. Sherman is in the AGFC’s focal testing area, according to AGFC Chief of Wildlife Management Brad Carner. “This positive sample falls squarely in the middle of our sampling area so we will not have to make any adjustments at this time. We will try to intensify our sampling in the immediate vicinity of this detection,” he added.

“We need to sample 300 deer to determine the prevalence and the spatial distribution of CWD in the population with 95 percent confidence,” said Dick Baxter, an assistant chief in the Wildlife Management Division.

Enough free-ranging deer have to be tested before there’s a strong statistical chance of detecting CWD in 1 percent of the herd. This is a common method to estimate CWD prevalence in deer populations. As results are analyzed, wildlife biologists will adjust the strategy.

“The test area will expand as positive (CWD) tests warrant,” said Cory Gray, AGFC deer program coordinator.

As of March 22, AGFC personnel have sampled 225 deer and 6 elk. Samples are being sent to the lab weekly. Results of the tests usually take 7 to 10 days.

Sampled deer and elk are processed at a base camp staffed by AGFC and National Park Service personnel. Meat from deer that don’t test positive for CWD will be given to landowners where the deer were harvested or Arkansas Hunters Feeding the Hungry. Everything that is not packaged for consumption will be incinerated.

“Landowners have been very helpful in allowing us access to their property,” Gray said. “Much of the land within the zone where we are working is privately owned. We need their help and help from anyone who sees a deer or elk that appears to be ill.”

The public can report sick deer and elk by calling 800-482-9262 or by email at [email protected], 24 hours a day.

Although there are no confirmed cases of CWD transmission from cervids to humans or to livestock, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization and the Arkansas Department of Health recommend that people not consume meat from animals known to be infected with CWD.

The AGFC is holding weekly public meetings in Jasper at Carroll Electric, 511 E Court St. The next meetings will be held March 24, 31 and April 7 beginning at 11 a.m.

Visit www.agfc.com/cwd for more information.

 

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