CWD regulations in Iowa

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Iowa, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Iowa can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Iowa

Sorry, our records do not show any CWD testing laboratories in your state, if you find this to be in error, please contact us.

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 2/2018)

1. Allamakee County
2. Wayne County

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Category Archives: Iowa

Iowa – Fatal deer disease confirmed in Wayne County – first case in wild deer outside northeast Iowa

A hunter-harvested adult doe taken in southeast Wayne County during the first shotgun deer season has tested positive for the presence of chronic wasting disease (CWD). This is the first hunter-harvested wild deer outside of northeast Iowa to test positive for the always fatal disease.

The deer was shot on Dec. 5.

“We contacted the hunter once it was confirmed,” said Terry Haindfield, wildlife biologist, and coordinator for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources chronic wasting disease monitoring effort. “The test results are disappointing but not surprising. We are seeing an increasing number of CWD positive deer in northeast Iowa and from our neighboring states.”

Haindfield said there have been seven additional CWD positive tests so far from deer in northeast Iowa that came from the 2017 seasons – six in Allamakee County and one in Clayton County. The Iowa DNR is awaiting the final set of test results from the special collection in Allamakee and Clayton counties in January.

“We will set up a meeting in Wayne County to discuss what this means for local hunters and landowners and listen to their concerns and together we will form a plan to try to prevent or contain this from getting a solid foothold,” he said.

Chronic wasting disease is a neurologic disease of deer and elk, belonging to the family of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases. Though it shares certain features with other TSEs like bovine spongiform encephalopathy (“Mad Cow Disease”) or scrapie in sheep, it is a distinct disease apparently affecting only deer, moose, and elk. It is always fatal.

The disease first appeared in the wild deer herd in 2013 and each year since, the Iowa DNR has placed extra emphasis on tracking the movement and attempting to stop or slow the disease with the cooperation of successful hunters.

Additional Information:
Article can be found here: Fatal deer disease confirmed in Wayne County – first case in wild deer outside northeast Iowa.

Contact: Terry Hainfield – 563-546-7960

Two Wild Deer Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease in Allamakee County

DES MOINES – Two wild deer harvested in Allamakee County during the recent hunting season have been confirmed positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD), marking the third year in a row the disease has been confirmed in a wild Iowa deer, all in Allamakee County.  

 “This is disappointing but not altogether surprising,” said Dr. Dale Garner, chief of Wildlife for the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. “This region was a focal point for increased surveillance and thanks to hunters in the area we exceeded our goal of 400 samples. Our next step is to host another public meeting up there, listen to their concerns and discuss options available going forward.”

The surveillance zone covered a 140 square mile area in eastern Allamakee and northeast Clayton County, including the area near Harper’s Ferry. The two recent CWD positive deer were harvested within two miles of where the previous positive deer were taken.

Last year, local residents partnered with the Iowa Department of Natural Resources to collect 85 additional samples after the regular deer seasons. None of those deer collected tested positive for the disease.

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is currently working to obtain as much information as possible about the infected deer to implement its CWD response plan.

CWD is a neurological disease affecting primarily deer and elk. It is caused by an abnormal protein, called a prion that attacks the brains of infected animals, causing them to lose weight, display abnormal behavior and lose bodily functions. Signs include excessive salivation, thirst and urination, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, listlessness and drooping ears and head. The only reliable test for CWD requires testing of lymph nodes or brain material after the animal is dead.

There is currently no evidence that humans contract CWD by eating venison. However, the World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that hunters do not eat the brain, eyeballs or spinal cord of deer and that hunters wear protective gloves while field dressing game and boning out meat for consumption.

Prior to the positive detection in Iowa, CWD had been previously detected in every bordering state.

Since 2002, nearly 60,000 wild deer from across the state have been tested.

Allamakee CWD Surveillance Complete – No New Cases Found

More than 100 deer were collected as part of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources surveillance effort looking for chronic wasting disease near Harpers Ferry in late February and early March.

Tissue samples from 85 of the adult deer collected were sent to the National Veterinary Services Lab in Ames for testing and all 85 samples came back as not detected. All collectors have been notified of the results.

“Landowners and local residents were outstanding with cooperation to help secure deer samples in this intensive surveillance effort,” reported Terry Haindfield, Iowa DNR wildlife biologist in northeast Iowa. “Weather extremes went from 25 below zero to 65 degrees above, affecting collecting success. The DNR greatly appreciates the public’s interest and the effort they put into helping collect deer for the additional samples.”

Although the number of samples collected was less than the goal of 200, the results are encouraging and suggest that CWD may not be established at a significant level. However, continued surveillance will be needed in order to provide a better picture of the prevalence of CWD on the landscape.

The DNR has scheduled a public meeting in the Harpers Ferry Community Center, 238 North Fourth Street, at 6:30 p.m. on April 16 to solicit input and begin planning for continued surveillance this summer and fall.

CWD is a neurological disease affecting primarily deer and elk. It is caused by an abnormal protein–a prion–that attacks the brains of infected animals, causing them to lose weight, display abnormal behavior and lose bodily functions. Signs include excessive salivation, thirst and urination, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, listlessness and drooping ears and head. It is always fatal, when an animal contracts it. The additional data is important, to determine the next course of action to slow the disease spread in Iowa.

The four Allamakee samples, which prompted this winter’s special collection, are the only CWD-positive returns on 55,000 samples of wild Iowa deer taken since 2002.

Cold, But Successful Start to CWD Deer Sampling in Allamakee County

Despite single digit temperatures and brutal winds, 27 deer were collected, and sampled over the weekend, to help determine the extent of Chronic Wasting Disease in southeast Allamakee County. Landowners and regular season hunters from the area are working with scientific collector permits to harvest adult deer across 31 sections, in two townships, near Harpers Ferry.

The goal is to collect 150 samples on private property and 50 in Yellow River State Forest, after three deer—harvested in the area during the 2014 hunting season—tested positive for CWD. In 2013, the first wild deer to test positive was taken in the same vicinity. Those four samples are the only CWD-positive returns on wild Iowa deer, among 57,000 samples collected, since 2002.

These special collection samples will be added to the 311 from deer harvested during the recently completed hunting season in the same sections.

“We are trying to keep this local and work with the people who have always helped us with CWD sampling through the years,” explains DNR wildlife biologist Terry Haindfield, who is coordinating the project. “A lot of them attended the public meetings last week, where we explained how the collection process would work. We want to see what is happening and the extent of the disease.”

Through the weekend, the DNR issued more than 60 scientific collectors permits, listing nearly 260 participants who were allowed multiple sample tags. Early participants this past weekend brought harvested deer to the CWD collection site, or called wildlife workers to their locations, to collect lymph nodes and brain stems. Collecting on public land will cease when 50 deer samples have been obtained. Collection will cease when overall samples have reached 200 or by March 15, whichever arrives first.

The samples will be tested at the National Veterinary Services Lab in Ames. As results are available, hunters will be notified. Any positive deer will be collected and disposed of by the DNR. Adult deer are targeted, since the always fatal disease does not show up in testing until the animal is about 18 months old.

About one third of the area lies within Yellow River Forest. The public should be aware of the presence of hunting activity — and wear blaze orange clothing in the area during the next couple of weeks. Wildlife officials believe they have sufficient participants to reach their goal by March 15. In addition to those harvested, if the public would report any road-killed deer in the area to the DNR, those will be tested.

CWD is a neurological disease affecting primarily deer and elk. It is caused by an abnormal protein –a prion — that attacks the brains of infected animals, causing them to lose weight, display abnormal behavior and lose bodily functions. Signs include excessive salivation, thirst and urination, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, listlessness and drooping ears and head. It is always fatal, when an animal contracts it. The additional data is important, to determine the next course of action to slow the disease spread in Iowa.

“With these individual confirmations, we treat them as sparks, rather than as a wildfire, at this time,” emphasizes Haindfield. “Many of the people involved were at the public meetings and understand what we are dealing with. That helps in the effort, to delineate where this disease is and how to curtail it at this level.”

Two Wild Deer Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease in Allamakee County

Two wild deer harvested during the recent hunting season have been confirmed positive for chronic wasting disease in Allamakee County.

The first case of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in a wild Iowa deer was confirmed in Allamakee County in 2014.

“This is precisely why we stepped up our efforts to increase the number of samples in a five-mile surveillance area around where we found the positive sample in 2014. The more information we have, the better position we are going to be in to implement a strategy to slow the spread,” said Iowa Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Bureau Chief Dale Garner.

“We can’t thank hunters enough for helping us collect the samples we needed,” said Garner.

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is currently working to obtain as much information as possible about the infected deer to implement its CWD response plan.

Currently, approximately half of the 300 samples collected in the surveillance area have been processed. Once all of the samples have been analyzed, Garner said public meetings will be scheduled in Allamakee County to discuss the results with the local public. DNR plans to collect additional samples.

CWD is a neurological disease affecting primarily deer and elk. It is caused by an abnormal protein, called a prion, that attacks the brains of infected animals, causing them to lose weight, display abnormal behavior and lose bodily functions. Signs include excessive salivation, thirst and urination, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, listlessness and drooping ears and head. The only reliable test for CWD requires testing of lymph nodes or brain material after the animal is dead.

There is currently no evidence that humans contract CWD by eating venison. However, the World Health Organization and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that hunters do not eat the brain, eyeballs or spinal cord of deer and that hunters wear protective gloves while field dressing game and boning out meat for consumption.

Prior to the positive detection in Iowa, CWD had been previously detected in every bordering state. Since 2002, the DNR has collected more than 900 samples of deer from within a five-mile radius of where the deer are believed to have been harvested. Statewide, approximately 57,000 wild deer have been tested since 2002.

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