CWD regulations in Maryland

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Maryland, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Maryland can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Maryland

Sorry, our records do not show any CWD testing laboratories in your state, if you find this to be in error, please contact us.

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 2/2016)

Allegany County

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Category Archives: Maryland

Five Deer Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease

Deer in the forestThe Maryland Department of Natural Resources has received laboratory confirmation that five white-tailed deer harvested in Allegany County tested positive for chronic wasting disease, a neurological disease in deer, bringing the total overall cases to 11. Four of the five deer were harvested in the Chronic Wasting Disease Management Area (the eastern one-third of the county). The other deer was taken near Cumberland, marking the first documented case outside of the Chronic Wasting Disease Management Area.

“Chronic wasting disease is an unfortunate but inevitable reality for a small amount of deer in western Maryland,” Wildlife and Heritage Service Director Paul Peditto said. “Given that this disease is now present in the region, our wildlife biologists will continue to work diligently to document and monitor its presence, which, so far, has been limited to Allegany County. We urge citizens to only consume the meat of deer that appear healthy.”

Concerns over the disease should not stop anyone from hunting deer or enjoying venison. There is no evidence that the disease can be transmitted to humans, livestock or other animals. It is recommended that hunters avoid consuming the meat of sick animals as well as the brain, spinal column or lymph nodes of deer — all of which are normally removed during the butchering process.

Maryland is one of more than 23 states and Canadian provinces with chronic wasting disease documented in deer, elk or moose. The department has intensively sampled for this disease since 2002, before it was initially found in the in West Virginia in 2005. The first confirmed case in Maryland was reported in February 2011. To date, 11 samples tested positive out of more than 8,500 deer tested in Maryland. Since 2010, sampling efforts have been focused on Allegany and western Washington counties due to the presence of the disease in nearby West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Ohio.

More information on chronic wasting disease, please click here. Anyone with questions may contact the department at 410-260-8540.

Four Maryland Deer Test Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease

Two deer in a forest the Maryland Department of Natural Resources received laboratory confirmation on January 16, 2015 that four additional white-tailed deer harvested in Maryland tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD), bringing the total number of overall positive cases to six. The deer, all male, were harvested in the CWD Management Area in Allegany County during the regular deer firearm season.

The first confirmed case of CWD in Maryland was reported in February 2011 and the second was found in 2014, both from Allegany County. Maryland is one of more than 20 states and Canadian provinces with CWD documented in deer, elk or moose.

“Chronic Wasting Disease has become firmly established in the region since it was initially found in West Virginia in 2005,” said Paul Peditto, director of DNR’s Wildlife and Heritage Service. “The Department has followed this outbreak closely and has been prepared to find additional infected deer in Maryland. We have sampled intensively for this disease since 2002 and see this as an unfortunate but inevitable outcome. We will continue to manage CWD with the best available science to minimize the impact on our deer population and the people who enjoy these great animals.”

Concerns over CWD should not stop anyone from deer hunting and enjoying venison. There is no evidence that the disease can be transmitted to humans, livestock or other animals. As always, hunters are advised to never consume the meat of sick animals. Hunters are also advised to avoid the brain, spinal column or lymph nodes of deer — all of which are normally removed during the butchering process.

To date, six positive samples have been found out of nearly 8,300 deer tested in Maryland since 1999. Beginning in 2010, sampling efforts have been focused on Allegany and western Washington counties due to the presence of CWD in nearby West Virginia, Virginia and Pennsylvania.

CWD is a fatal disease that attacks the brain and spinal cord of deer and elk, specifically white-tailed deer, moose, mule deer and Rocky Mountain elk. While the exact cause is not known, it is believed to be a prion disease. A prion is an altered protein that causes other normal proteins to change and cause sponge-like holes in the brain. The disease appears to be passed between animals via saliva, feces or urine. More information on CWD in Maryland is available on the DNR website.

Anyone with questions may contact DNR Wildlife and Heritage Service at 410-260-8540. Keep up to date with DNR Wildlife and Heritage Service on Facebook and Twitter @MDDNRWildlife.

DNR Implements New Regulations To Prevent Spread Of Deer Disease

Annapolis, Md. — The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announces new regulations to help prevent the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD). These regulations, effective immediately, apply only to a small portion of Allegany County, and ban the use of bait and limit the movement of deer carcasses.

“Our goal with these regulations is to prevent the spread of this disease to other areas in Maryland and nearby states,” said Pete Jayne, DNR’s Game Program Manager. “We have focused these restrictions to be effective and enforceable while minimizing impacts to the strong deer hunting traditions found in Western Maryland, especially around the popular Green Ridge State Forest area.”

The regulations are necessary after it was confirmed that a white-tailed deer harvested in November 2010 in Green Ridge State Forest tested positive for CWD, the only confirmed case of CWD in Maryland.

The new regulations apply ONLY to the CWD Management area -the portion of Allegany County noted as Private Land Code 233 in the annual Guide to Hunting and Trapping. This section includes a portion of Green Ridge State Forest east of Flintstone and Oldtown.

In this area, feeding forest game birds and mammals is prohibited on both public and private lands. This regulation bans feeding on a year-round basis and includes feed placed for both hunting and non-hunting purposes. The ban prohibits fruit, vegetables, nuts, hay, corn, wheat, other feed, salt or other mineral-based being placed out as attractants. Forest game birds and mammals are defined as wild turkey, grouse, deer, bear and squirrels. Gland and urine-based lures are still permitted. Normal agricultural practices and operations are exempted from this ban, including the planting and harvesting of crops and operations associated with livestock care. The normal feeding of song birds remains legal.

The transportation of certain parts of deer carcasses out of the CWD Management Area is restricted unless the carcass is being transported directly to an approved deer processor within Allegany County. The following parts of deer may be transported out of the CWD Management Area: Antlers with no meat or soft tissue attached, finished taxidermy mounts, clean hides with no head attached, boneless meat and skull plates cleaned of all meat and brain tissue.

B&B Butchering, 10649 Orleans Road NE, Little Orleans, Maryland. 301-478-2558 and B&B Country Meats, 11329 Upper Georges Creek Road, Frostburg, Maryland. 301-689-6225 are commercial deer processors cooperating with DNR to properly process deer taken from the CWD Management Area.

DNR is placing dumpsters at several locations within the CWD Management Area for use by hunters that choose to butcher their own deer. The hides, bones and other waste products that are left over after a deer is butchered should be placed in these dumpsters for proper disposal. Dumpster locations will be noted in posters placed throughout the CWD Management Area and can be seen online. Hunters may also call 301-777-2136 for a map showing the dumpster locations and cooperating processors.

Chronic Wasting Disease Found in a White-tailed Deer in Maryland

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) received laboratory confirmation on February 10, 2011 that a white-tailed deer harvested in Maryland tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD). This is the first confirmed case of CWD in Maryland. A hunter in Allegany County reported taking the deer on November 27, 2010 in Green Ridge State Forest. Maryland is now one of 21 other states and Canadian provinces with CWD documented in deer, elk or moose.

“Our team of wildlife professionals has been preparing for this result for some time so we are well-informed and ready to limit the impact of this event,” said Paul Peditto, Director of DNR’s Wildlife and Heritage Service. “We have sampled intensively for this disease since 2002 and see this as an unfortunate but somewhat inevitable outcome. The good news is that our preparation and planning ensure a sound scientific foundation for our response to this single positive test result. With the continued cooperation of hunters, farmers, deer processors and landowners who have supported our monitoring effort, we will manage this deer disease consistent with the best available science and with minimal impact on our deer population and the people who enjoy these great animals.”

“Concerns over CWD should not stop anyone from enjoying venison,” added Peditto, who explained that only four species of the deer family are known to be susceptible to CWD: elk, mule deer, moose and white-tailed deer. Of these, only the white-tailed deer occurs in the wild in Maryland and there are no reported cases of transmission to humans or other animals.

As always, hunters are advised to exercise caution and never consume the meat of sick animals. Hunters are also advised to avoid contact with the brain, spinal column or lymph nodes of deer — all of which are normally removed during the butchering process.

This is the first positive sample out of nearly 6,800 deer tested in Maryland since 1999. From 2002 until 2009 that sampling occurred statewide. In 2010, sampling efforts were focused on Allegany and western Washington counties due to the presence of positive cases in nearby West Virginia and Virginia. West Virginia first detected CWD in Hampshire County in 2005 and it was found in Frederick County, Virginia in early 2010.

“Maryland will continue to work closely with the wildlife professionals in our adjacent states to share information and coordinate response efforts. However, our primary goal is to ensure the public is fully-informed and knows what we know when we know it. We want to be certain that every interested Marylander understands this disease and recognizes that there is no risk to people, pets or domestic livestock. As in every other state with CWD, we will respond appropriately while ultimately learning to live with this disease with little impact to our wildlife or citizens,” Peditto concluded. For more information on CWD in Maryland and the DNR Response Plan, please visit the DNR Website

Maryland Deer Test Negative for Chronic Wasting Disease

Recent laboratory tests conducted by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife & Heritage Service confirm there is no evidence of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Maryland. Tissue samples collected from 1,106 deer during the 2009-2010 Maryland deer hunting seasons revealed no signs of the disease. Additional samples collected from sick or injured deer also tested negative for CWD. Over 6,700 Maryland deer have been tested and confirmed as CWD-free since 2002.

“CWD surveillance remains an agency priority and is essential to maintaining a healthy deer herd,” said George Timko, DNR’s Assistant Deer Project Leader. “DNR biologists and technicians will continue to collect and test tissue samples from hunter-harvested deer as well as from sick and injured deer.”

CWD is a neurological disease that is fatal to white-tailed deer and other members of the deer family. Similar to mad cow disease in cattle, the disease attacks the brain and spinal cord of deer and is believed to be caused by prions, rogue proteins that destroy healthy tissue. CWD is not known to be transmissible to humans.

CWD was first identified in 1967 at a Colorado research facility. Since then, CWD has been found in 18 states and two Canadian provinces. CWD has not been found in white-tailed deer or sika deer in Maryland.

Additional CWD information is available on the DNR website and on the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance website www.cwd-info.org.

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