CWD regulations in Maryland

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Maryland, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Maryland can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Maryland

Sorry, our records do not show any CWD testing laboratories in your state, if you find this to be in error, please contact us.

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 2/2016)

Allegany County

Most Recent CWD News

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  • Deer in the forest The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has received laboratory confirmation that five white-tailed deer harvested in Allegany County tested positive for chronic wasting disease, a neurological disease in deer, bringing the total overall cases to 11. Four of the five deer were harvested in the

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  • Two deer in a forest the Maryland Department of Natural Resources received laboratory confirmation on January 16, 2015 that four additional white-tailed deer harvested in Maryland tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD), bringing the total number of overall positive cases to six. The deer,

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  • Annapolis, Md. — The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announces new regulations to help prevent the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD). These regulations, effective immediately, apply only to a small portion of Allegany County, and ban the use of bait and limit the movement

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  • The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) received laboratory confirmation on February 10, 2011 that a white-tailed deer harvested in Maryland tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD). This is the first confirmed case of CWD in Maryland. A hunter in Allegany County reported taking

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  • Recent laboratory tests conducted by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife & Heritage Service confirm there is no evidence of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in Maryland. Tissue samples collected from 1,106 deer during the 2009-2010 Maryland deer hunting seasons revealed no signs of the

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  • Deer population Disease-Free for Six Consecutive Years

    ANNAPOLIS — Samples collected from more than 900 deer during the 2007-2008 Maryland deer hunting season showed no signs of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Recent laboratory test results confirmed no evidence of the disease in brain and lymph nodes

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Category Archives: Maryland

Maryland Deer Test Negative For Chronic Wasting Disease

Deer population Disease-Free for Six Consecutive Years

ANNAPOLIS — Samples collected from more than 900 deer during the 2007-2008 Maryland deer hunting season showed no signs of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Recent laboratory test results confirmed no evidence of the disease in brain and lymph nodes collected from 983 deer. Additional samples from sick or injured deer also showed no signs of the disease. During the past six years, over 4600 Maryland deer have been tested and were CWD-free.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) biologists collected brain and lymph gland samples during the state’s 2007-08 muzzleloader and firearm deer hunting seasons across every Maryland county.

“This is great news for Maryland hunters, landowners, farmers and anyone who has an appreciation for a healthy, sustainable deer population,” Assistant Deer Project Leader George Timko said. “Critical to the success of this project was the cooperation of our many partners in federal, state and county government, as well as private landowners and farm managers. All of these individuals played an integral role in gathering the data that contributes to our informed response on this issue.”

CWD is a neurological disease that is fatal to cervids. The disease attacks the brain and spinal cord of the animals and is believed to be caused by prions, or rogue proteins. CWD is classified as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy similar to “Mad Cow Disease” in cattle and Scrapie in sheep. CWD is also similar to Creutzfeld-Jacobs disease in people, though it is not known to be transmissible to humans.

CWD was originally discovered in Colorado in 1967 and was thought to be a disease of western deer and elk. Since then, monitoring by state, federal, and provincial wildlife agencies have detected the disease in 14 states and 2 Canadian provinces. CWD has been confirmed in free-ranging cervids in Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Utah, Illinois, New York, Kansas and West Virginia. It has also been found in captive cervids in Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Minnesota and New York. CWD is also confirmed in free ranging and captive cervids in the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta.

In 2005, CWD was detected in white-tailed deer in central New York and approximately 10 miles from the Maryland border in West Virginia. Since it’s detection in West Virginia, Maryland DNR biologists and partners increased ongoing surveillance in Allegany County near the West Virginia location. A total of 105 samples were collected in Allegany County in 2007-08. All samples tested negative for CWD.

CWD. Surveillance will continue in all 23 Maryland counties during the 2008-09 deer hunting seasons. Citizens are encouraged to report any deer that appears sick to the local DNR office. These animals, if exhibiting CWD-like symptoms and collected in a timely manner, will be examined by wildlife veterinarians and tested for CWD.

Chronic Wasting Disease Not Found in Maryland Deer

ANNAPOLIS – Testing of 969 deer taken during the 2006 Maryland deer hunting season and an additional 13 samples from sick appearing deer finds no sign of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Almost 3700 Maryland free ranging deer have been tested for CWD since 2002.

Since CWD was identified within Hampshire County West Virginia in September 2005, the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) enhanced ongoing surveillance in adjacent Allegany County, Maryland. All 120 Allegany CWD samples collected in 2006 did not indicate infection.

DNR biologists collected the brain and lymph gland samples during Maryland’s 2006-07 muzzleloader and firearms deer hunting seasons across all Maryland counties. Veterinarians of the Maryland Department of Agriculture and veterinarians and biologists of the United States Department of Agriculture assisted DNR with the collection of the CWD samples. Other volunteers included wildlife biologists from the United States Fish & Wildlife Service, Montgomery County Department of Parks and Planning, Howard County Department of Recreation & Parks and Chesapeake Farms.

The Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study (SCWDS) lab located at the University of Georgia conducted the testing of these brain and lymph gland samples. The SCWDS, an internationally known wildlife disease research lab, processes the samples for Maryland and many southeastern states.

CWD is fatal to deer, elk and moose. The disease attacks the brain and spinal cord of the animals and is believed to be caused by prions, which are modified proteins. CWD is classified as a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy similar to “Mad Cow Disease” in cattle and Scrapie in sheep.

CWD has been confirmed in free-ranging cervids within the following states: Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Utah, Illinois, New York, Kansas and West Virginia. It has also been found in captive cervids in the following states: Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, Montana, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, Minnesota and New York. CWD is also confirmed in free ranging and captive cervids in the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta.

An additional 850 samples of hunter-harvested deer will be collected from all 23 Maryland counties during the 2007-2008 deer hunting seasons. Any sick deer reported to DNR that exhibit CWD type clinical symptoms will be examined by wildlife veterinarians and tested for CWD.

Additional CWD information is available on the DNR website or on the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance web site.

Maryland Implements New Meat Importation Regulation Due to CWD Disease

ANNAPOLIS — Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) today announced a new regulation that restricts the importation of meat and parts of deer, elk, moose, and other cervids from areas within those states and Canadian provinces that have confirmed cases of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). CWD is a naturally occurring disease of the brain and nervous system of deer, elk and moose. It is fatal, but has not been found in Maryland’s deer herd and has not been shown to be transmissible to humans. This new regulation reduces the potential for CWD to be introduced in Maryland.

Effective immediately, a hunter may only bring into Maryland the following parts of a dead deer, elk, moose or other cervid taken from a CWD positive area in another state or province:

  • Meat without the backbone

  • Meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached

  • Cleaned hide with no head attached

  • Skull plate cleaned of all meat and brain tissue

  • Antlers with no meat or soft tissue attached

  • Clean upper canine teeth, also known as buglers, whistlers or ivories

  • Finished taxidermy mount or tanned hide

The restricted deer body parts (brain, spinal column, lymph glands, etc) contain the highest concentrations of infectious tissues. By restricting the importation of high-risk tissues from known CWD infected areas, the risk of CWD being transported into Maryland is reduced.

The importation regulation applies to deer, elk, moose and other cervids taken from CWD positive areas identified in the following states and Canadian provinces: West Virginia, New York, Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Utah, Illinois, Kansas, Oklahoma, Montana, Minnesota, Alberta Province and Saskatchewan Province.

DNR will maintain a list of CWD positive states and provinces on its website at http://www.dnr.state.md.us/huntersguide/chronic.asp or you can call 410-260-8540 for more information. Restrictions on importation only apply to those areas identified in state or province as CWD-Positive. Hunters should visit the appropriate state or provincial website to determine if they will be hunting in a CWD positive area.

Any person who imports or possesses a deer, elk, moose or other cervid carcass or part of a cervid carcass that was tested for CWD in another state or province and is notified that the cervid tested positive, must report the test results to DNR with 24 hours of receiving the notification. The person must notify DNR by calling 410-713-3851 or faxing 410-341-7952 or emailing [email protected]

Travelers may pass through Maryland with deer, elk, moose or other cervid carcasses, provided that no parts are disposed of or remain in the state.

While no human has been infected by CWD, hunters and others who handle cervid carcasses should remain vigilant in their meat-handling techniques. DNR recommends the following common sense tips for handling any harvested cervid:

  • Avoid shooting or handling a deer that appears sick.

  • Wear latex or rubber gloves when field-dressing or butchering deer.

  • Remove all internal organs.

  • Remove the meat from the bones and spinal column.

  • Do not use household knives or utensils.

  • Avoid cutting through bones or the spinal column (backbone).

  • Never eat a deer’s brain, eyeballs, spinal cord, spleen or lymph nodes.

  • If you saw off antlers, cut through a bone, or if you sever the spinal cord with a knife, be sure to disinfect these tools prior to using them for the butchering or removal of meat.

  • Remove all fat, membranes and connective tissue from the meat. Note that normal field dressing and trimming of fat from meat will remove the lymph nodes.

  • Always wash hands and instruments thoroughly after dressing and processing game meat.

  • Use a 50/50 solution of household chlorine bleach and water to disinfect tools and work surfaces. Wipe down counters and let them dry; soak knives and tools for 1 hour.

Additional CWD information is available on the DNR website at http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/cwdinformation.html or on The Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance web site http://www.cwd-info.org.

Chronic Wasting Disease Not Found In Allegany County Deer

ANNAPOLIS – The Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife and Heritage Service announced today that none of the 75 Allegany County white-tailed deer that have been sampled for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in recent months were found to have the disease.

The 49 Maryland hunter-harvested deer and 26 vehicle killed deer or deer taken by Allegany County farmers using Deer Management Permits were tested at the University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. About 850 hunter-harvested deer will be screened for CWD across Maryland’s 23 counties this year. Over 1,700 Maryland hunter-harvested deer have been tested for CWD from 2002 though 2004 and no CWD has been found.

Maryland stepped-up its ongoing efforts to screen Maryland deer for CWD earlier this year after the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources verified that a positive CWD white-tailed deer was identified in Hampshire County, West Virginia, about 10 miles south of Allegany County.

CWD is a disease known to infect white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. CWD is related to other transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases that include scrapie in sheep, mad cow disease in cattle, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) in humans. TSE diseases are believed to be caused by prions, abnormal cell proteins that cause other cell proteins to change.

There is no current evidence that humans can contract CWD from eating venison. However, relatively little is known about CWD and as a result, researchers and public officials are taking a cautious approach to the disease. DNR recently published new CWD guidelines for hunters which can be found at http://www.dnr.maryland.gov/dnrnews/pressrelease2005/111705a.html Additional information concerning CWD can be found on the Maryland DNR website at http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/cwdinformation.asp.

DNR Enlists Hunters’ Help in Protecting State Against CWD

ANNAPOLIS – In an on going effort to protect the state’s deer herd from Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) requests that Maryland deer hunters voluntarily abide by certain guidelines when bringing deer parts into Maryland from West Virginia or other CWD-positive states or Canadian Provinces. CWD, a fatal disease of deer and elk, was recently discovered in several white-tailed deer in Hampshire County, West Virginia. The guidelines for hunters are:

  • Hunters can bring into Maryland deer meat that is detached from the bones, cleaned hide and cape, antlers, antlers attached to a clean skull cap, clean upper canine elk teeth, a tanned hide or finished taxidermy mount.

  • All other parts should be disposed in the state or province of harvest according to that state or province’s guidelines.

DNR thanks all hunters for voluntarily cooperating with these guidelines. Regulations will be proposed for the 2006-07 deer hunting seasons that will restrict the importation of certain deer parts from CWD positive states and provinces.

Further in formation on CWD can be found on the DNR website www.dnr.maryland.gov and the CWD Alliance website www.cwd-info.org

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