CWD regulations in Minnesota

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Minnesota, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Minnesota can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Minnesota

Minnesota- University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
1333 Gortner Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108
612-625-8780 or 800-605-8787
www.ahc.umn.edu/ahc_content/colleges/new_vet_med/Veterinary_Diagnostic_Lab/

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 11/2016)

Olmsted and Fillmore counties

Most Recent CWD News

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  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Friday, August 30, 2002

    Chronic Wasting Disease found in a farmed elk from Aitkin County. Case marks the first time this disease has been detected in Minnesota

    ST. PAUL, Minn. - The Minnesota Board of Animal Health today announced that a single animal

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  • Though chronic wasting disease hasn't been found in Minnesota's wild deer herd, hunters this fall will be able to get their deer tested for the disease by the University of Minnesota's Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in St. Paul.

    The lab is getting special equipment and expects

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  • More than 150 veterinarians at 98 clinics have agreed to collect brain stem samples for Chronic Wasting Disease testing from deer harvested during this fall's firearms season.

    Samples will be sent to the University of Minnesota's Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in St. Paul for testing. Hunters

    Read More
    • 3
  • Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has taken the headlines in the media on numerous occasions as of late. I know that here at the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association (MDHA) we have been heavily involved in the disease since it was discovered in Wisconsin back in March

    Read More
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  • Minnesota deer hunters fearful of chronic wasting disease can have their animals tested at a university lab this fall.

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources assistant wildlife director, Ed Boggess, said the testing will give skittish hunters "reassurance."

    "However, based on the best scientific information available,

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  • The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources announced today that no positives were found in five additional chronic wasting disease test results from deer killed in the nine-square-mile Aitkin surveillance area.

    A total of 69 deer have been tested for CWD from the surveillance area, which

    Read More
    • 3
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Category Archives: Minnesota

No CWD Detected in Minnesota’s Wild Deer

All of the samples from wild deer taken last fall by hunters in southeastern Minnesota that were tested for the presence of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) have come back negative for the disease.

“This is good news for Minnesota,” said Dr. Erika Butler, wildlife veterinarian for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR). “Extensive tests on wild deer in southeastern Minnesota and additional targeted tests of sick animals statewide all have been CWD negative.”

DNR conducted tests on 2,685 deer that hunters harvested last fall in southeastern Minnesota. An additional 28 deer from other parts of the state were sampled because they displayed clinical signs of an illness. None tested positive for CWD.

CWD naturally occurs in cervids, which include North American deer, Rocky Mountain Elk and moose. The disease belongs to a group of infectious diseases known as “transmissible spongiform encephalopathies” (TSEs). It is caused by an abnormal protein called a prion, which affects the animal’s brain and is invariably fatal. Usually, months to years pass from the time an animal is infected to when it shows signs of the disease.

CWD infected captive elk were discovered on a farm near Pine Island in 2009. As a result, the Board of Animal Health (BAH) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) depopulated the farm’s elk and DNR conducted extensive testing for CWD in southeastern Minnesota wild deer during last fall’s firearms deer hunting season.

A high proportion of the samples were obtained within a 15-mile radius of the CWD-positive captive elk farm, as well as along the Minnesota-Wisconsin border where Minnesota deer are in closest proximity to an area of Wisconsin where CWD infection is established in wild deer.

“DNR has collected more than 33,000 samples in statewide surveillance efforts since CWD testing began in 2002 and all tests have been negative,” Butler said. “However, periodic surveillance in the vicinity of previous cases of CWD in captive cervids and along the Wisconsin border remains prudent.”

Surveillance efforts within a 15-mile radius of the CWD-infected cervid farm in Olmsted County will be repeated during 2010 firearm hunting season. Targeted surveillance of suspect deer will continue throughout the state.

Typical signs of CWD include drooping head or ears, poor body condition, tremors, stumbling, increased salivation, difficulty swallowing, or excessive thirst or urination. The disease was first discovered in Colorado and Wyoming, and has since been detected in wild or captive animals in Illinois, South Dakota, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, Virginia, West Virginia, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Montana, Utah, Wisconsin, Saskatchewan and Alberta.

The World Health Organization and the U. S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention have found no scientific evidence to date that CWD can be transmitted to humans.

Chronic Wasting Disease Found in a Farmed Elk From Olmsted County

Chronic Wasting Disease found in a farmed elk from Olmsted County Mandatory surveillance program leads to detection of positive elk; state initiates investigation

ST. PAUL, Minn. – The Minnesota Board of Animal Health today announced that a farmed elk from an Olmsted County herd tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).

The brain stem and lymph nodes from a 7-year-old female elk were submitted to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, after the animal was slaughtered. NVSL confirmed the animal had CWD. The Board of Animal Health quarantined the herd on January 23, 2009. This quarantine means no cervidae (members of the deer and elk family) can move on or off the farm. Meanwhile, officials continue to investigate the source of the infection and whether other cervidae may have been exposed.

In 2003, Minnesota implemented mandatory registration and CWD surveillance programs for farmed cervidae herds. When farmed cervidae over 16 months of age die or are slaughtered, herd owners must submit brain samples for CWD testing.

CWD is a fatal brain and nervous system disease found in cervidae in certain parts of North America. The disease is caused by an abnormally shaped protein called a prion, which can damage brain and nerve tissue. Infected animals show progressive loss of body weight with accompanying behavioral changes. In later stages of the disease, infected animals become emaciated (thus “wasting” disease). Other signs include staggering, consuming large amounts of water, excessive urination, and drooling.

According to state health officials and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no evidence that CWD can be transmitted to humans. For more information on CWD and the BAH, visit their website.

Chronic Wasting Disease Found in a Farmed Deer from Lac Qui Parle County

ST. PAUL, Minn. – The Minnesota Board of Animal Health today announced that a farmed whitetailed deer from a Lac Qui Parle County herd tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).

The brain stem and lymph nodes from a 10-year-old female white-tailed deer were submitted to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, after the animal was euthanized due to illness. NVSL confirmed the animal had CWD. The Board of Animal Health quarantined the herd on March 14, 2006. This quarantine means no cervidae (members of the deer and elk family) can move on or off the farm. Meanwhile, officials continue to investigate the source of the infection and whether other cervidae may have been exposed.

In 2003, Minnesota implemented mandatory registration and CWD surveillance programs for farmed deer and elk herds. When farmed deer or elk die or are slaughtered, herd owners must submit brain samples for CWD testing. The herd from which the CWD positive animal came has been registered with the state since 1997.

CWD is a fatal brain and nervous system disease found in elk and deer in certain parts of North America. The disease is caused by an abnormally shaped protein called a prion, which can damage brain and nerve tissue. Infected animals show progressive loss of body weight with accompanying behavioral changes. In later stages of the disease, infected animals become emaciated (thus “wasting” disease). Other signs include staggering, consuming large amounts of water, excessive urination, and drooling.

According to state health officials and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no evidence that CWD can be transmitted to humans.

In addition to Minnesota’s case, CWD has been found in farmed deer or elk in Colorado, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Montana, Wyoming, Wisconsin, New York, and Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada. Cases have been found in wild deer or elk in Wisconsin, Wyoming, Colorado, South Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Utah, Illinois, West Virginia, New York, Kansas, and Alberta and Saskatchewan, Canada.

For more information on CWD and the BAH, visit their website at www.bah.state.mn.us.

No CWD Found As 2004 Minnesota Testing Is Completed

No positives were found in tests for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) of nearly 13,000 lymph node samples taken from wild deer harvested during the 2004 deer season, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) announced today.

CWD testing of hunter-harvested deer is complete. Since 2001, the DNR has tested nearly 30,000 wild deer for CWD. The disease has never been detected in the state’s wild deer herd.

“After three years of intensive sampling, we’re very pleased not to have found CWD in any of Minnesota’s wild deer,” said Lou Cornicelli, DNR big game program coordinator. “We’re also grateful for the cooperation we received from hunters, volunteers and organizations throughout this extensive testing process.”

CWD is a fatal disease that attacks the brain tissues in deer and elk causing lethargy, disorientation and emaciation. CWD was detected in two farmed elk in Aitkin and Stearns counties in 2002 and 2003, respectively.

Efforts to monitor for CWD in wild deer will now focus on collecting samples from deer that are found sick or displaying symptoms consistent with CWD. “Although we’re relieved that our statewide surveillance has not found CWD in wild deer, we need to continue long-term monitoring efforts,” said Mike DonCarlos, DNR wildlife program manager.

The 2004 CWD effort involved more than 500 people from DNR, University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine and College of Natural Resources, North Dakota State University, Minnesota Conservation Corps, St. Cloud State University, Vermillion Community College, Fond du Lac and 1854 Authorities, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and other universities and volunteers. The Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Minnesota is conducting all the tests.

Hunters who volunteered a sample this year received a DNR cooperator patch and were placed in a drawing to win one of several firearms and bows being offered by Gander Mountain, Minnesota Deer Hunters Association, Cabela’s, the Minnesota State Archery Association, the Minnesota Bowhunters Inc., Sportsmans Warehouse, and Austin-Halleck muzzleloaders. MDHA has completed the drawing and the winners have been notified.

“I’d like to thank the organizations for their generous donations, the hunters for donating the samples, and the many volunteers who stepped up to help”, Cornicelli said. He said that the cooperation was outstanding and he is encouraged that statewide surveillance has been completed.

CWD testing results by permit area are available on the DNR Web site at www.dnr.state.mn.us.

No Positives Found in First Round of Chronic Wasting Disease Tests

No positives were found in Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) tests of 682 lymph node samples taken from wild deer harvested during the 2004 firearms season, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources announced today.

The results are the first from 12,500 samples that were taken from wild deer harvested by hunters this year. Samples were collected at 130 big game registration stations located in the north-west, north-central, east-central and southwest portions of the state.

“We’re encouraged by the initial round of results and hopeful the remaining samples will be negative as well,” said Lou Cornicelli, DNR big game program coordinator. “Once again, we’re appreciative of the fact that hunters were glad to help us out. The process went very well.”

Samples tested were from deer harvested in permit areas 152, 170 and 225. Results are posted at http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/mammals/deer/cwd/testingresults2004.html.

Additional permit areas will be posted online as they are completed.

The 2004 CWD effort involved more than 500 people from DNR, University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine, College of Natural Resources, North Dakota State University, Minnesota Conservation Corps, Vermillion Community College, Fond du Lac and 1854 Authorities, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other Universities and volunteers. The Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Minnesota is conducting all the tests.

Hunters who volunteered a sample this year received a DNR cooperator patch and were placed in a drawing to win one of several firearms and bows being offered by Gander Mountain, the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association, Cabela’s, the Minnesota State Archery Association, Sportsman’s Warehouse and Austin-Halleck muzzleloaders.

This is the third and final year of DNR testing for CWD in Minnesota’s wild deer population. During the 2002 and 2003 deer hunting seasons, the DNR collected and tested 14,450 deer, none of which tested positive for CWD.

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