CWD regulations in Minnesota

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Minnesota, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Minnesota can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Minnesota

Minnesota- University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
1333 Gortner Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108
612-625-8780 or 800-605-8787
www.ahc.umn.edu/ahc_content/colleges/new_vet_med/Veterinary_Diagnostic_Lab/

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 11/2016)

Olmsted and Fillmore counties

Most Recent CWD News

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  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Friday, August 30, 2002

    Chronic Wasting Disease found in a farmed elk from Aitkin County. Case marks the first time this disease has been detected in Minnesota

    ST. PAUL, Minn. - The Minnesota Board of Animal Health today announced that a single animal

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  • Though chronic wasting disease hasn't been found in Minnesota's wild deer herd, hunters this fall will be able to get their deer tested for the disease by the University of Minnesota's Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in St. Paul.

    The lab is getting special equipment and expects

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  • More than 150 veterinarians at 98 clinics have agreed to collect brain stem samples for Chronic Wasting Disease testing from deer harvested during this fall's firearms season.

    Samples will be sent to the University of Minnesota's Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in St. Paul for testing. Hunters

    Read More
    • 3
  • Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has taken the headlines in the media on numerous occasions as of late. I know that here at the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association (MDHA) we have been heavily involved in the disease since it was discovered in Wisconsin back in March

    Read More
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  • Minnesota deer hunters fearful of chronic wasting disease can have their animals tested at a university lab this fall.

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources assistant wildlife director, Ed Boggess, said the testing will give skittish hunters "reassurance."

    "However, based on the best scientific information available,

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  • The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources announced today that no positives were found in five additional chronic wasting disease test results from deer killed in the nine-square-mile Aitkin surveillance area.

    A total of 69 deer have been tested for CWD from the surveillance area, which

    Read More
    • 3
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Category Archives: Minnesota

Hunters Who Submit Samples for CWD Testing Eligible for Prizes; 22 Sites in Northeastern Minnesota

To encourage hunters to bring their deer in to Department of Natural Resources (DNR) chronic wasting disease (CWD) sites, the DNR along with several organizations and businesses are offering prizes through a drawing. All hunters, in select permit areas, who turn in a sample will receive a cooperator patch and be automatically entered in a drawing to win one of several firearms and bows that are being provided as an incentive from the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association, Gander Mountain, Bluffland Whitetails Association, Austin-Halleck, and the Minnesota Sport Archery Association.

CWD was on every hunter’s mind during the 2002 deer season when the DNR identified a case in a captive elk. And, while there has not been a documented case in the wild in Minnesota, the DNR is continuing the deer sampling again this year.

Hunters in select permit areas are asked to submit deer for CWD testing during the upcoming firearms deer season (DNR staff will remove the deer’s head at the registration site). Statewide, the DNR is looking to collect at least 13,000 samples. Northeastern Minnesota will have 22 sampling locations covering seven permit areas in four counties.

Counties and permit areas *Cook County – all permit areas (116, 126, 127) *Lake County – all permit areas (115, 116, 122, 127, 180) *St. Louis County – four permit areas (115, 122, 178, 180) *Itasca County – one permit area (178)

Collection dates and hours (additional days if necessary) *Sat., Nov. 8 12 noon to 10 p.m. *Sun., Nov. 9 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. *Mon., Nov. 10 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

Sampling locations in Northeast Minnesota (alphabetical by county):

  • Buck’s Hardware Hank at Grand Marais, (Cook County)

  • Lockport Store at Lutsen, (Cook Co.)

  • Fred’s at Goodland, (Itasca Co.)

  • Beaver Bay Sports at Beaver Bay, (Lake Co.)

  • Conoco Little Store at Two Harbors, (Lake Co.)

  • Wildhurst Lodge at Finland, (Lake Co.)

  • Blomberg’s at Babbitt (St. Louis Co.)

  • Charlstroms at Duluth (St. Louis Co.)

  • Cook Country Store at Cook (St. Louis Co.)

  • Crossroads Store at Eveleth (St. Louis Co.)

  • Gateway Store at Kabetogama (St. Louis Co.)

  • Hugos at Brimson (St. Louis Co.)

  • ICO at Cotton (St. Louis Co.)

  • Lucky 7 at Virginia (St. Louis Co.)

  • Lucky 7 at Hoyt Lakes (St. Louis Co.)

  • Lucky 7 at Ely (St. Louis Co.)

  • Meadowlands COOP at Meadowlands (St. Louis Co.)

  • Mooseline Cafe at Fairbanks (St. Louis Co.)

  • Pelican Bay IGA at Orr (St. Louis Co.)

  • Vermilion Fuel and Food at Tower (St. Louis Co.)

  • Vermilion River Tavern at Buyck (St. Louis Co.)

  • J&T General Store at Makinen (St. Louis Co.)

Hunters who harvest deer outside of the permit areas where DNR is collecting samples will be able to get their deer tested through local veterinarians. Those vets that will do testing are listed on the DNR web site at www.dnr.state.mn.us.

Even though CWD has not been found in wild deer in Minnesota, hunters should take the following precautions:

  • Do not shoot an animal that is acting abnormally or appears to be sick. Contact the local DNR conservation officer or DNR wildlife office immediately.

  • Wear durable rubber gloves when field dressing carcasses. Wash hands and instruments thoroughly after field dressing.

  • Bone out the meat from the animal. Don’t saw through bone and avoid cutting through the brain or backbone.

  • Do not eat brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils or lymph nodes. The normal process of boning meat will remove most, if not all of these tissues.

DNR reminds hunters that they must present the deer at the time of registration to legally comply with the registration requirements.

For more information, contact: Jeff Lightfoot, Regional Wildlife Manager, Grand Rapids, 218-327-4413 or your local wildllife office.

Firearms Hunters in Surveillance Areas Encouraged to Submit Deer for CWD Testing

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is planning extensive CWD testing during the upcoming firearms deer season. Section of Wildlife staff hope to collect upwards of 13,000 samples this year. Sampling will occur at over 130 big game registration stations in 60 permit areas located in the northwest, northeast, east-central and west-central portions of the state. A map detailing the permit areas can be found at: www.dnr.state.mn.us/mammals/deer/cwd/testingstations.html.

All hunters who turn in a sample will receive a cooperator patch and be automatically entered in a drawing to win one of several firearms and bows that are being provided as an incentive from the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association, Gander Mountain, Bluffland Whitetails Association, Austin-Halleck, and the Minnesota Sport Archery Association.

All registration stations will be open Nov. 8-9. Some will be open Nov. 15-16, Nov. 22-23, and Nov. 29-30 depending on achievement of sampling goals. Hunters should contact their local wildlife office to find out when their check station will be operating.

Cornicelli said a streamlined sampling process will help staff collect the additional samples this year, although weather and hunter success will still play a large role in the effort’s success.

“We made several refinements that should make the process more efficient this year,” Cornicelli said. “Deer permit areas have been clustered so more deer that arrive at a DNR staffed registration will be sampled. We have also streamlined the data collection process, which should allow hunters to get in and out of the registration station quickly.”

Also different from last year’s procedure will be the type of test run on samples, Cornicelli said. This year a lymph node will be removed from the harvested deer’s head for testing rather than brain stem tissue. The deer’s head will still need to be removed at the registration station. Fawns will not be tested because the prevalence rate of the disease is so low it can’t be detected with reliability at that age.

Cornicelli reminded hunters that they must present the deer at the time of registration to legally comply with the registration requirements.

Hunters who harvest deer outside areas where the DNR is collecting samples and who are interested in getting their deer tested will again be able to submit a sample through their local veterinarian. The list is available on the DNR Web site.

So far, CWD in Minnesota has been found only in farmed elk. One elk tested positive for CWD after it died on an Aitkin County farm in August 2002. A second elk, which was part of a herd where the Aitkin elk originated, tested positive after it was quarantined and killed for testing on a Stearns County farm in January 2003. While CWD has not been found in Minnesota’s wild deer herd, hunters should follow these precautions:

  • Do not shoot an animal that is acting abnormally or appears to be sick; contact the local DNR conservation officer or DNR wildlife office immediately so an attempt can be made to find and dispatch the animal for testing
  • Wear durable rubber gloves when field dressing carcasses and wash hands and instruments thoroughly after field dressing
  • Bone out the meat from the animal; don’t saw through bone and avoid cutting through the brain or backbone
  • Do not consume brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils or lymph nodes. The normal process of boning meat will remove most, if not all of these tissues.

Testing results will be available at the DNR Web site at www.dnr.state.mn.us once the sampling for the permit area is completed.

Archery Deer Hunters Encouraged to Submit Deer for Chronic Wasting Disease Testing

As part of previously announced plans to test more than 13,000 wild deer for chronic wasting disease (CWD) during this fall’s hunting seasons, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will be collecting samples from archery deer hunters in designated surveillance areas.

While the majority of effort will take place during the firearms deer season, the DNR is also encouraging archery deer hunters who take deer in the surveillance permit areas to submit samples. The list of deer permit areas can be found at: www.dnr.state.mn.us/mammals/deer/cwd/testingstations.html.

Archers who take a deer in one of the surveillance permit areas are encouraged to call their local DNR wildlife office to arrange dropping off their deer head. Locations and phone numbers for wildlife offices can also be found on the DNR Web site or by calling 1-888-MINNDNR (646-6367). When the deer head is collected, the hunter will be asked a few questions pertaining to where the animal was harvested, said Lou Cornicelli, big game coordinator for the DNR Division of Wildlife.

No positive results were found last year in tests on about 4,400 deer. This fall, the goal is to test 13,000 hunter-harvested deer for CWD. The intensified effort is part of a plan to test wild deer throughout Minnesota in the next two to three years.

All hunters who turn in a sample will receive a cooperator patch and will be automatically entered in a drawing to win one of several firearms that are being provided as an incentive by the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association, Gander Mountain, and Bluffland Whitetails Association.

So far, CWD in Minnesota has been found only in farmed elk. One elk tested positive for CWD after it died on an Aitkin County farm in August 2002. A second elk, which was part of a herd where the Aitkin elk originated, tested positive after it was quarantined and killed for testing on a Stearns County farm in January 2003.

While CWD has not been found in Minnesota’s wild deer, hunters should follow these precautions:

• do not shoot an animal that is acting abnormally or appears to be sick; contact the local DNR conservation officer or DNR wildlife office immediately so an attempt can be made to find and dispatch the animal for testing

• wear durable rubber gloves when field dressing carcasses and wash hands and instruments thoroughly after field dressing

• bone out the meat from the animal; don’t saw through bone; avoid cutting through the brain or backbone

• do not consume brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils or lymph nodes. The normal process of boning meat will remove most, if not all of these tissues.

Testing results will be available on the DNR Web site at www.dnr.state.mn.us once the sampling for the permit area is completed.

New Carcass Law for Out-of-State Big Game Hunters

This fall, big game hunters will need to take additional steps prior to bringing deer, elk, moose or caribou carcasses into Minnesota from other states or provinces, according to the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).

The new law takes effect August 1 and bans the importation of whole cervid carcasses into the state. Cervids are members of the deer family and include white-tailed and mule deer, elk, moose, and caribou. Pronghorn, bighorn sheep, and Rocky Mountain goat carcasses are not affected by the new regulation because they are not cervids.

The new carcass law specifies only the following portions of hunter-harvested cervidae carcasses may be brought into the state: cut and wrapped meat; quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; antlers, hides, or teeth; finished taxidermy mounts; and antlers attached to skull caps that are cleaned of all brain tissue. Out of state hunters are encouraged to work with outfitters, processors, landowners, or taxidermists in the area they plan to hunt to make prior arrangements for partially or wholly processing their animals before bringing them back into the state.

The law was passed to help protect Minnesota deer from chronic wasting disease (CWD), which is a degenerative prion disease that affects deer and elk. While much is known about CWD, the specific mode of transmission is unknown and the carcass restriction is one of several steps being taken to minimize the risk of exposure of wild deer. “We know that the disease is transmitted from animal to animal and that prions can persist in the environment,” said Lou Cornicelli, DNR wildlife big game program coordinator, “This law is a preventive measure to help protect the health of Minnesota’s deer.”

The DNR also recommends the following precautions related to hunter harvest and preparation of big game for human consumption:

· Do not shoot an animal that is acting abnormally or appears to be sick. Report it to the local DNR Conservation Officer or wildlife office immediately. They will attempt to find and dispatch the animal for testing.

· Wear durable rubber gloves when field dressing carcasses and wash hands and instruments thoroughly after field dressing.

· Bone out the meat from your animal. Don’t saw through bone, and avoid cutting through the brain or backbone.

· Do not consume brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, tonsils, or lymph nodes. The normal process of boning meat will remove most, if not all of these tissues. Additional information on CWD can be found at www.dnr.state.mn.us and www.cwd-info.org.

CWD Tests on Hunter-Harvested Deer Complete, No Positives Found

No positives have been found in more than 5,000 Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) tests run on brain-stem samples collected from Minnesota’s wild deer during the fall of 2002, the Department of Natural Resources announced today.

The University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory has completed testing on 4,462 samples collected at registration stations during the 2002 firearms deer season. An additional 540 samples were tested at the request of hunters who paid veterinarians to extract samples. CWD is a fatal brain disease of deer and elk that has been found in two farmed elk but no wild deer in Minnesota.

“This is great news, but by no means are we saying that Minnesota’s wild deer population has a clean bill of health,” said Mike DonCarlos, research manager for the DNR Division of Wildlife. “CWD testing will absolutely be part of DNR deer management plans for the foreseeable future.”

DNR wildlife researchers are currently designing a plan to collect samples from hunter-harvested deer at a different set of big game registration stations next fall. Eventually, the DNR plans to collect samples from wild deer in all permit areas across Minnesota.

Permit areas are prioritized for CWD sample collection based on their geographic location in the state, overall deer population, and concentration of deer and elk farms, DonCarlos said.

In addition to sample collection during hunting seasons, the DNR will continue the year-round effort to collect samples from “suspect” deer that are found sick or displaying symptoms consistent with CWD.

NO PLANS TO CULL

DNR officials said they have no plans to cull wild deer for additional CWD sampling in the area surrounding the farm where a second CWD-positive elk was discovered in January.

“More than 900 samples were collected from three permit areas near the farm last fall,” DonCarlos said. “We will focus our efforts between now and next fall on collecting and testing any ‘suspect’ or dead deer that we can get from the vicinity of the farm.”

Minnesota’s response to CWD and testing efforts are projected to cost about $1 million, which will be paid for through existing funding.

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