CWD regulations in Minnesota

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Minnesota, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Minnesota can be seen below:

Click a section to expand:


FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Minnesota

Minnesota- University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
1333 Gortner Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108
612-625-8780 or 800-605-8787
www.ahc.umn.edu/ahc_content/colleges/new_vet_med/Veterinary_Diagnostic_Lab/

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 11/2016)

Olmsted and Fillmore counties

Most Recent CWD News

  • All
  • 3
  • Default
  • Title
  • Date
  • Random
  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Friday, August 30, 2002

    Chronic Wasting Disease found in a farmed elk from Aitkin County. Case marks the first time this disease has been detected in Minnesota

    ST. PAUL, Minn. - The Minnesota Board of Animal Health today announced that a single animal

    Read More
    • 3
  • Though chronic wasting disease hasn't been found in Minnesota's wild deer herd, hunters this fall will be able to get their deer tested for the disease by the University of Minnesota's Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in St. Paul.

    The lab is getting special equipment and expects

    Read More
    • 3
  • More than 150 veterinarians at 98 clinics have agreed to collect brain stem samples for Chronic Wasting Disease testing from deer harvested during this fall's firearms season.

    Samples will be sent to the University of Minnesota's Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in St. Paul for testing. Hunters

    Read More
    • 3
  • Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has taken the headlines in the media on numerous occasions as of late. I know that here at the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association (MDHA) we have been heavily involved in the disease since it was discovered in Wisconsin back in March

    Read More
    • 3
  • Minnesota deer hunters fearful of chronic wasting disease can have their animals tested at a university lab this fall.

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources assistant wildlife director, Ed Boggess, said the testing will give skittish hunters "reassurance."

    "However, based on the best scientific information available,

    Read More
    • 3
  • The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources announced today that no positives were found in five additional chronic wasting disease test results from deer killed in the nine-square-mile Aitkin surveillance area.

    A total of 69 deer have been tested for CWD from the surveillance area, which

    Read More
    • 3
load more hold SHIFT key to load all load all

News by Year

2017 (1)2016 (1)2015 (1)2013 (1)2012 (1)2011 (5)2010 (1)2009 (1)2006 (1)2005 (1)2004 (6)2003 (9)2002 (15)

Category Archives: Minnesota

Aitkin County, Minn.: Tests So Far Find No CWD in Deer Herd

Test results from 103 wild deer killed so far near an Aitkin County farm show no evidence of chronic wasting disease, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources said Tuesday.

At least eight more deer from that 9-square-mile area remain to be tested for the incurable ailment that strikes deer and elk.

After a captive bull elk died of it at the farm in August, the DNR organized an effort to kill and test area deer to determine whether the disease has spread into the wild herd.

Statewide, the agency estimates it has collected 4,700 samples for CWD tests, a level slightly lower than its goal of 5,000 to 6,000. It has not received as many deer as it expected from the southeast part of the state, said Mike DonCarlos, DNR wildlife research manager.

“Right now, we’re not sure why,” DonCarlos said. “But it appears that hunters weren’t as concerned about CWD as we expected and didn’t bring deer to registration stations where sampling was being conducted.”

Nonetheless, he said the samples should provide a fairly good picture of whether the disease exists in the wild in Minnesota.

“We will still be able to predict with 95 percent confidence if CWD exists at a 1 percent infection rate in permit areas where we hit our sampling goal,” DonCarlos said. “Precision may be slightly lower in permit areas where we fell short.”

Next year, he said additional samples may be collected from permit areas where samples fell short this season.

CWD Sample Collection Falls Short of Goal; Analysis Will Be Adjusted

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources officials estimate they collected about 4,700 samples for Chronic Wasting Disease tests during the firearms deer season, which opened Nov. 9.

Last week, after most firearms seasons ended in northern Minnesota, the DNR had collected about 4,000 samples. An additional 1,000 samples were to be collected during the Zone 3B either-sex season in southeastern Minnesota, which began Nov. 23.

The goal was to collect between 5,000 and 6,000 samples at selected registration stations across the state. The effort was as part of an ongoing surveillance program to determine if CWD is present in the state’s wild deer herd, according to Mike DonCarlos, research manager for the DNR Wildlife Division.

“Although we’re pleased with the overall number, we didn’t get as many deer as we expected at registration stations in southeast Minnesota,” DonCarlos said. “Right now, we’re not sure why. But it appears that hunters weren’t as concerned about CWD as we expected and didn’t bring deer to registration stations where sampling was being conducted.”

After this year’s analysis of all CWD test results, DNR wildlife officials will design future CWD sampling efforts. Next year, additional samples may be collected from permit areas where sample collection fell short this season.

“We will still be able to predict with 95 percent confidence if CWD exists at a 1 percent infection rate in permit areas where we hit our sampling goal,” DonCarlos said. “Precision may be slightly lower in permit areas where we fell short.”

RESULTS FROM THE AITKIN SURVEILLANCE AREA Additional test results from the nine-square-mile surveillance area near Aitkin have been received. So far, 103 of the 111 wild deer killed in the area have been tested. None have tested positive for CWD.

Meat from deer culled in the surveillance zone has been distributed to interested landowners and to a food shelf.

CWD, a fatal brain disease known to infect deer and elk, was discovered in a farmed elk near Aitkin in August. It has not been detected in the state’s wild deer herd.

DNR Approaching Goal of 5,000 Samples for CWD Testing

Deer hunters submitted about 500 additional samples for chronic wasting disease tests during the second weekend of Minnesota’s firearms deer season, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The firearms deer season began Nov. 9.

The DNR estimates that it has collected about 4,000 of the 5,000 to 6,000 total samples needed. A final tally of viable samples collected will not be available until lab results are complete.

The samples were collected at selected registration stations across the state as part of an ongoing surveillance program to determine if CWD is present in the state’s wild deer herd.

“We will now concentrate our efforts in Zone 3B (southeast Minnesota), where the antlerless deer season begins on Nov. 23,” said Ed Boggess, assistant director for the DNR Division of Wildlife. “Most of our sampling stations in northern and southwest Minnesota met their goals.”

DNR staff, tribal staff and volunteers were stationed at selected big-game registration stations in 16 permit areas around the state. Hunters who registered deer were asked to voluntarily submit their deer for sampling. Only deer that were one year old or older and harvested in certain areas were sampled.

According to early estimates, the majority of antlerless permit areas reached their goals of collecting approximately 360 samples in the first and second weekends of the firearms deer season. Several southeastern Minnesota stations will continue their efforts through the Zone 3B season, which runs from Nov. 23 through Nov. 29 in southeastern Minnesota.

“We hope to collect an additional 1,000 samples during that season,” Boggess said. “It is a popular season and we should be able to reach that goal.”

CWD, a fatal brain disease known to infect deer and elk, was discovered in a farmed elk near Aitkin in August. It has not been detected in the state’s wild deer herd.

About 3,500 Samples Collected to Test for Chronic Wasting Disease

Deer hunters submitted about 3,500 samples for chronic wasting disease tests during the first weekend of Minnesota’s firearms deer season, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

The DNR intends to collect between 5,000 and 6,000 total samples at selected registration stations across the state as part of an ongoing surveillance program to determine if the disease is in the state’s wild deer herd.

According to early estimates, six of the 16 antlerless permit areas reached their goal of collecting about 360 samples in the first weekend of the firearms deer season. The remaining 10 permit areas will continue to collect samples throughout the firearms deer season or until their goals are reached.

“We had good success collecting samples in the northern permit areas,” said Mike DonCarlos, research manager for the DNR Division of Wildlife. “It appears that hunter success was lower in the south, and we didn’t get as many samples there.”

A total of 717 samples were collected in the Aitkin area (Deer Permit Area 154), and at least 285 were collected on the Iron Range in Permit Area 175. No more samples will be collected in those areas, DonCarlos said.

A total of 272 samples were collected in combined Permit Areas 181/199 north and west of Duluth, said Mike Schrage, wildlife biologist with the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, who supervised sampling in those areas. Schrage said more samples may be collected this weekend.

Most hunters expressed little concern about chronic wasting disease, Schrage said.

“I had two hunters all weekend I talked to who said they were going to wait for the results before they ate their deer,” Schrage said. “The incentive to get their deer tested wasn’t there.”

Volunteers, DNR staff and tribal staff were stationed at selected big-game registration stations in 16 permit areas around the state. Hunters who brought deer in for registration were asked to voluntarily submit their deer for sampling. Only deer that were 1 year old or older and harvested in certain areas were sampled.

Chronic wasting disease, a fatal brain disease known to infect deer and elk, was discovered in a captive elk near Aitkin in August. It has not been found in Minnesota’s wild deer herd.

State-of-the-Art Incinerator Used to Dispose of Deer Remains

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources used a state-of-the-art incinerator to dispose of remains from deer culled for chronic wasting disease testing in the Aitkin area.

The device was developed by a Florida company for disposing of carcasses a well as wood and debris. It is located at the Mille Lacs Wildlife Management Area just north of Milaca.

“The incinerator is designed to burn eight tons of material per hour at 2,800 degrees, which gives us a large capacity if we would ever need that,” said Dennis Simon, DNR acting operations manager. “It is the most efficient, cleanest system available for disposing of animal carcasses.”

Representatives from the manufacturer trained staff from the DNR and Department of Agriculture.

Most of the venison from the Aitkin culling operation was distributed to area landowners or a food shelf. Unsalvageable carcasses, entrails and heads from deer culled at Aitkin were disposed.

The incinerator operates with a diesel engine that pumps high velocity air into a wood-fueled burn chamber, creating an “air curtain” that raises the temperature while recirculating and burning particles from the fire.

“It should be a virtually smoke-free operation,” said Simon.

The equipment meets all applicable air quality standards set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

“It is one of the safest ways we found to dispose of multiple carcasses in a short time,” said DNR research manager Mike DonCarlos. “A number of other states use similar techniques to dispose of carcasses, including CWD-positive animals.”

The incinerator was purchased by the DNR for about $70,000, which will be paid for with CWD funding. It will be used for disposing of deer or other animal carcasses in the future.

Subscribe to our Newsletter!