CWD regulations in Mississippi

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Mississippi, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Mississippi can be seen below:

Click a section to expand:


FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Mississippi

Sorry, our records do not show any CWD testing laboratories in your state, if you find this to be in error, please contact us.

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 11/2018)

1. Issaquena 2. Pontotoc

Most Recent CWD News

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  • 11/29/2018 8:09:14 AM From MDWFP Issaquena – The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP) received confirmation from the National Veterinary Services Laboratory that the hunter-harvested 2.5-year-old, female white-tailed deer voluntarily submitted in Issaquena County on November 1, 2018, tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease
    Read More
  • 10/30/2018 3:24:47 PM From MDWFP PONTOTOC – The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP) received confirmation from the National Veterinary Services Laboratory that a white-tailed deer collected in Pontotoc County on October 8, 2018 tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). MDWFP has established
    Read More
  • 8/20/2018 8:41:51 AM From MDWFP
    JACKSON – The Mississippi Commission on Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks, adopted regulations for the revised Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Management Zone for the 2018-2019 hunting season during the August 16, 2018 meeting held at J.P. Coleman State Park. Regulations were approved
    Read More
  • JACKSON – A white-tailed deer collected on January 25, 2018, in Issaquena County has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). The deer was a 4.5-year-old male that died of natural causes and was reported to the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks. This is
    Read More
  • Reports were solid on big bucks, smaller bucks and doe, and Mississippi still ranks as one of the states with the largest population per capita in the United States.

    But what about diseases such as chronic wasting disease and blue tongue?

    "Healthwise, we are in

    Read More
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  • Growing concern over a fatal brain disease in deer reported in some Western states has lawmakers and wildlife officials cooperating to postpone - if not block entirely - its spread into Mississippi.

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) creates sponge-like holes in the deer's brain, causing the animal to

    Read More
    • 2

Category Archives: Mississippi

MS – UPDATE: Second Issaquena County White-tailed Deer Confirmed for CWD

11/29/2018 8:09:14 AM
From MDWFP

Issaquena – The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP) received confirmation from the National Veterinary Services Laboratory that the hunter-harvested 2.5-year-old, female white-tailed deer voluntarily submitted in Issaquena County on November 1, 2018, tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).  “This deer was harvested by a hunter on Mahannah Wildlife Management Area (WMA) and voluntarily submitted to our drop-off station located on site,” said Russ Walsh, Executive Wildlife Director. “We have seen great participation so far this season, but we still need hunters to continue providing samples as part of our statewide monitoring effort.”

To monitor CWD in the Issaquena Zone and throughout the state, MDWFP will rely on hunter-harvested deer & voluntary sample submission during the 2018–19 hunting season.  Hunters can submit deer for testing at established drop-off locations (including Mahannah WMA).  Also, MDWFP will staff check stations to collect samples during high-traffic dates:

Issaquena Zone

Times:

  • 9:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.

Dates:

  • Saturday, December 29 and January 5
  • Sunday, December 30 and January 6

Locations:

  • Onward Store
  • Junction of Hwy. 465 and 61 (boat ramp)

Pontotoc Zone

Times:

  • 9:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m

Dates:

  • Saturday, December 29 and January 5

Locations:

  • Ecru Volunteer Fire Department
  • Pontotoc County Compound (across from Prater’s Grocery on Hwy 41)

For more information about Chronic Wasting Disease visit www.mdwfp.com/cwd. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mdwfp or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MDWFPonline.

MS – Chronic Wasting Disease Confirmed in Pontotoc County

10/30/2018 3:24:47 PM
From MDWFP

PONTOTOC – The Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks (MDWFP) received confirmation from the National Veterinary Services Laboratory that a white-tailed deer collected in Pontotoc County on October 8, 2018 tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).  MDWFP has established the Pontotoc CWD Management Zone that includes Pontotoc and Union counties and all portions of Lee County west of Hwy 45.  For any MDWFP-defined CWD Management Zone it is unlawful to:  

  • Supplemental feed; 
  • Establish new mineral sites or add supplements to existing sites; 
  • Remove certain portions of cervid carcasses from the zone (carcass regulations); or 
  • Trap wild hogs without a permit from MDWFP.


(click to enlarge)

To monitor CWD in the Pontotoc Zone, MDWFP will rely on hunter-harvested deer during the 2018–19 hunting season.  Hunters can submit deer for testing at established drop-off locations or MDWFP-staffed check stations. 

MDWFP will host a public meeting to discuss Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) at North Pontotoc Attendance Center on Thursday, November 8 at 6:00 PM. Presentations by MDWFP staff will be on the status of CWD and planned monitoring activities.  Biologists and Law Enforcement officials will be available to answer questions.    

For more information about Chronic Wasting Disease visit www.mdwfp.com/cwd. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mdwfp or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MDWFPonline 

MS – CWD Regulations Adopted for 2018-2019 Hunting Season

8/20/2018 8:41:51 AM
From MDWFP

JACKSON – The Mississippi Commission on Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks, adopted regulations for the revised Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Management Zone for the 2018-2019 hunting season during the August 16, 2018 meeting held at J.P. Coleman State Park. Regulations were approved after the thirty day comment period and take effect immediately. The new zone includes portions of Issaquena, Sharkey, and Warren counties and is identified as all areas south of Highways 14 and 16, areas west of the Yazoo River, all portions of Warren County, and all areas east of the Mississippi River.

The supplemental feeding ban and permitted hog trapping are lifted in Hinds, Claiborne, and Yazoo counties. Within the revised zone, supplemental feeding is banned and hog trapping must be permitted through Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks. (MDWFP)  Also, no portions of cervid carcasses may be transported outside of the zone. For products that may leave the CWD Management Zone see the 2018-2019 CWD Hunting Season Handout located at mdwfp.com/cwd.

MDWFP will host a public meeting to discuss Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) at Warren Central High School on Thursday, August 30 at 6 p.m. located in the Auditorium. Presentations by MDWFP staff will be on the status of CWD and planned monitoring activities for the 2018-2019 hunting season.  Representatives from MDWFP will be available to answer questions.

Those unable to attend can view the meeting via Facebook Live on the MDWFP Facebook Page. Viewers can ask questions in the comment box during the video.

For more information about Chronic Wasting Disease, or to report a sick animal, visit www.mdwfp.com/cwd. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mdwfp or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MDWFPonline.

Mississippi – Chronic Wasting Disease Confirmed in a Mississippi White-tailed Deer

JACKSON – A white-tailed deer collected on January 25, 2018, in Issaquena County has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). The deer was a 4.5-year-old male that died of natural causes and was reported to the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks.

This is the first time an animal in Mississippi has tested positive for the disease, which is fatal to white-tailed deer. MDWFP will immediately implement the CWD Response Plan under the auspices of the Commission on Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks.

Pursuant to the Order of the Executive Director on behalf of the Commission, effectively immediately, supplemental feeding is banned in the following counties: Claiborne, Hinds, Issaquena, Sharkey, Warren, and Yazoo.

CWD was first documented among captive mule deer in Colorado in 1967, and has been confirmed in 24 states, three Canadian provinces, and two foreign countries. It has been found in the free-ranging herds in 22 states and among captive cervids in 16 states.

According to the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance, CWD affects only cervids (hoofed animals in the cervidae family such as deer, elk, and moose). CWD affects the body’s nervous system. Once in the host’s body, prions transform normal cellular protein into an abnormal shape that accumulates until the cell ceases to function. Infected animals begin to lose weight, lose their appetite, and develop an insatiable thirst. They tend to stay away from herds, walk in patterns, carry their head low, salivate, and grind their teeth.

For more information regarding CWD in Mississippi, visit our website at www.mdwfp.com or call us at (601) 432-2199. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mdwfp or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MDWFPonline.

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Additional Information

Chronic Wasting Disease Fact Sheet

Mississippi Chronic Wasting Disease Management Zone

Healthy Deer Turn Out

Reports were solid on big bucks, smaller bucks and doe, and Mississippi still ranks as one of the states with the largest population per capita in the United States.

But what about diseases such as chronic wasting disease and blue tongue?

“Healthwise, we are in good shape,” said Larry Castle, chief of wildlife for the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks. “We are monitoring CWD, and we have not found any nor do we expect to find any CWD in our deer herd. We have a good sample coverage across the state, and we are on top of monitoring the disease.

“We do have a lot of blue tongue disease, but that is nothing new or anything to be alarmed about.”

Chronic wasting disease is related to mad cow disease, and there is no cure. It’s a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). It’s caused by a little-understood protein known as prion, which sets off a chain reaction in brain tissue, causing some of the brain’s own proteins to change into an aberrant form. It’s ultimately fatal to infected animals. Diseased animals will show changes in their normal behavior, exhibit excessive weight loss, salivation, stumbling and tremors. Cervids, which are members of the deer family and consist of whitetail deer, elk and red deer, are susceptible. Experts say there is no scientific evidence that CWD can infect humans, but the World Health Organization advises people not to eat any part of a deer with the infection.

Bluetongue is an insect-borne, viral disease primarily of sheep, occasionally goats and deer. The disease is not contagious and is transmitted only by insect vectors. Humans are not infected.

The disease is characterized by fever, widespread hemorrhages of the oral and nasal tissue, excessive salivation, and nasal discharge. In acute cases, the lips and tongue become swollen, and this swelling may extend below the lower jaw. Lameness, due to swelling of the cuticle above the hoofs, and emaciation, due to reduced feed consumption because of painful inflamed mouths, may also be symptoms of this disease. The blue tongue that gives the disease its name occurs only in a small number of cases.

“I want to stress that we have not found any CWD in Mississippi,” Castle said. “Blue tongue has taken some of our deer and that causes us to see fewer deer. A lot of things are blamed when we see fewer deer when it could be habitat.”

Regardless, Castle said the herd in Mississippi still ranges between 1.5 million and 1.7 million. He expects that Mississippi hunters will kill 300,000 deer on a 1-to-1 ratio between bucks and doe. The average age of bucks in Mississippi is still around three years.

“Deer quality was good this year,” Castle said. “Deer numbers may be average, though. I’ve talked with some hunters who say they had the best year yet. Then some will tell me that is was their worst year. I think when the numbers are in, we’ll be somewhere in the middle.

“We are nowhere near being out of deer. Sure, there are places where deer observations were down, and that could be due to habitat. The state of the union is in good shape, and when you look at the whole state, our deer herd is in good shape.”

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