CWD regulations in Missouri

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Missouri, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Missouri can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Missouri

Sorry, our records do not show any CWD testing laboratories in your state, if you find this to be in error, please contact us.

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 4/2018)

Adair, Cedar, Cole, Franklin, Jefferson, Linn, Macon, Oregon, Perry, Polk, St. Clair, Ste Genevieve counties

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Category Archives: Missouri

MO – MDC reports deer tests positive for CWD in Oregon county

By Lucas Bond, Oct 25, 2018

OREGON COUNTY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reports that an adult female deer in Oregon County has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). A landowner found a dead deer on their property and was concerned. MDC was notified, and staff collected a sample and had it tested for CWD.

This is the first deer found dead in Missouri that has tested positive for CWD. The nearest confirmed CWD positive is over 70 miles away in Arkansas. This new CWD positive case brings the total number of CWD cases detected in free ranging deer in Missouri to 76 since 2012.

“We will be working cooperatively with hunters and landowners in the coming months to test more deer in this area and assess the extent of the disease in Oregon County,” MDC Wildlife Disease Coordinator Jasmine Batten said.

CWD is a fatal disease that effects deer and other members of the deer family, called cervids. There have been no cases of CWD infecting humans, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that hunters harvesting deer in areas known to have CWD to get their deer tested before consuming meat.

Hunters in or around Oregon County can have their deer tested during normal business hours at the Ozark Regional Office in West Plains. Hunters can bring the entire deer — preferably field dressed — or the head with at least 6 inches of the neck in place to the office and MDC staff will take a sample to have it tested for CWD.

Hunters that harvest deer outside of business hours can remove the head, keep it cool, and bring it to the office during business hours. Additional sampling opportunities can be found online at https://bit.ly/2SgjUqH.

“Sampling deer that show possible signs of CWD is one important piece of our surveillance efforts, and we greatly appreciate the public’s assistance,” Batten said.

For more information about CWD visit mdc.mo.gov/cwd.

MO – MDC offers free voluntary CWD testing statewide all season

MDC offers free voluntary CWD testing statewide all season

News from the region

Statewide

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) wants deer hunters to know that it is offering free chronic-wasting-disease (CWD) sampling and testing of deer harvested anywhere in the state throughout the entire deer hunting season – Sept. 15 through Jan. 15, 2019. The sampling is voluntary and hunters can also get free test results for their deer.

Hunters can have their deer sampled at 11 select MDC offices around the state. Hunters can also take their deer to 64 participating taxidermists and meat processors located in the 48 counties of MDC’s CWD Management Zone. (See map for CWD Management Zone counties.)

Find locations and more information on voluntary CWD sampling at mdc.mo.gov/cwd under “Voluntary CWD Sampling All Season.”

MDC asks hunters to Telecheck their deer before taking them to a CWD sampling location. Hunters can bring the entire deer — preferably field dressed — or the head with at least 6 inches of the neck in place. Heads that have the cape removed for taxidermy can also be sampled.

CWD test results can take up to four weeks from the time of sample submission. Hunters can get test results for their CWD-sampled deer online at mdc.mo.gov/CWDTestResults.

Mandatory CWD Sampling Nov. 10 and 11 in 31 counties

MDC will again conduct mandatory CWD sampling in 31 of the 48 counties of its CWD Management Zone during the opening weekend of the fall firearms deer season, Nov. 10 and 11. The counties include new ones added to the CWD Management Zone, counties with previous CWD positives, and counties very near previous positives.

The 31 counties for mandatory CWD sampling are: Adair, Barry, Bollinger, Cape Girardeau, Cedar, Cole, Crawford, Franklin, Grundy, Hickory, Jefferson, Knox, Linn, Macon, Madison, McDonald, Mercer, Moniteau, Ozark, Perry, Polk, Putnam, St. Charles, St. Clair, St. Francois, Ste. Genevieve, Stone, Sullivan, Taney, Warren, and Washington.

Hunters who harvest deer from these counties Nov. 10 or 11 must take their deer — or the head with at least 6 inches of the neck in place — on the day of harvest to one of 61 MDC CWD mandatory sampling stations. Deer may be presented at any mandatory sampling station.

Find locations for mandatory CWD sampling at mdc.mo.gov/cwd under “Mandatory CWD Sampling Nov. 10-11.”

MO – MDC EXPANDS DEER FEEDING BAN TO MORE COUNTIES IN RESPONSE TO CWD

News from the regionStatewide

By Joe Jerek, Jun 12, 2018

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) has expanded its restrictions on feeding deer and placing minerals for deer to seven new counties in response to finding cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in or near them. The seven new counties are: Bollinger, Cape Girardeau, Grundy, Madison, McDonald, Mercer, and Perry. The feeding ban for these seven new counties becomes effective July 1.

These seven new counties join 41 existing counties of the Department’s CWD Management Zone where feeding deer and placing minerals for deer is restricted. The Zone consists of counties in or near where cases of the disease have been found. The 48 counties are: Adair, Barry, Benton, Bollinger, Boone, Callaway, Cape Girardeau, Carroll, Cedar, Chariton, Cole, Cooper, Crawford, Dade, Franklin, Gasconade, Grundy, Hickory, Jefferson, Knox, Linn, Livingston, Macon, Madison, McDonald, Mercer, Miller, Moniteau, Morgan, Osage, Ozark, Perry, Polk, Putnam, Randolph, Schuyler, Scotland, Shelby, St. Charles, St. Clair, St. Francois, Ste. Genevieve, St. Louis, Stone, Sullivan, Taney, Warren, and Washington.

According to the Wildlife Code of Missouri, the placement of grain, salt products, minerals, and other consumable natural and manufactured products used to attract deer is prohibited year-round within counties of the CWD Management Zone. Exceptions are feed placed within 100 feet of any residence or occupied building, feed placed in such a manner to reasonably exclude access by deer, and feed and minerals present solely as a result of normal agricultural or forest management, or crop and wildlife food production practices.

“CWD is spread from deer to deer and the potential for transmission increases when deer are unnaturally congregated,” said MDC Wildlife Disease Coordinator Jasmine Batten. “CWD can also spread when healthy deer come into contact with salvia, urine, or feces shed into the environment by infected deer. Placing feed and minerals for deer can facilitate the spread of diseases such as CWD. Recent research has confirmed the presence of CWD at mineral sites, which further supports this ban.”

For the seven new counties, MDC has also increased the availability of antlerless permits, and expanded the firearms antlerless portion to help harvest more deer in the counties and limit the spread of the disease.

MDC confirmed 33 new cases of CWD following the testing of nearly 24,500 free-ranging Missouri deer through its sampling and testing efforts last season. The new cases were found in Adair, Cedar, Franklin, Jefferson, Linn, Macon, Perry, Polk, St. Clair, and Ste. Genevieve counties. These new cases bring the total number of free-ranging deer in Missouri confirmed to have CWD to 75.

For more information on the feeding ban, visit MDC online at mdc.mo.gov/cwd under “Feeding Ban and Other Regulations.”

MO – MDC REPORTS 33 CWD POSITIVES OUT OF NEARLY 24,500 SAMPLES TESTED

MDC REPORTS 33 CWD POSITIVES OUT OF NEARLY 24,500 SAMPLES TESTED

News from the region

Statewide
Apr 06, 2018

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reports 33 new cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) have been found following the testing of 24,486 free-ranging Missouri deer through its 2017-2018 sampling and testing efforts. The new cases were from the following counties:

  • Adair: 3
  • Cedar: 1
  • Franklin: 4
  • Jefferson: 1
  • Linn: 7
  • Macon: 3
  • Perry: 1
  • Polk: 3
  • St. Clair: 4
  • Ste. Genevieve: 6

Of the 33 new cases, 16 were from hunter-harvested deer, one was from a road-killed deer, and 16 were from MDC’s post-season targeted culling efforts in the immediate areas around where previous cases have been found.

This year’s findings bring the total number of free-ranging deer in Missouri confirmed to have CWD to 75. For more information, visit mdc.mo.gov/cwd under “CWD in Missouri.”

“For a third year in a row, we found no CWD-positive deer in central Missouri, where a single case was confirmed in early 2015,” said MDC Wildlife Disease Coordinator Jasmine Batten. “Additionally, we found no cases of CWD on the Missouri-Arkansas border, despite the high level of CWD in northwest Arkansas.”

Batten added that where CWD has been found in Missouri, the numbers of positives remain relatively low.

“It is encouraging that cases of CWD are still pretty low overall, and MDC remains committed to monitoring the disease and taking actions to limit its spread,” she said. “We encourage hunters and landowners to continue participating in our CWD monitoring and management efforts.”

Batten added that these efforts are vital in limiting the spread of the disease.

“If we do nothing, areas affected by CWD will increase in size and many more deer will become infected by the disease,” she explained. “Over time, this would lead to significant long-term population declines.”

MDC WILL CONTINUE CWD SAMPLING THIS FALL AND WINTER

MDC will again require mandatory sampling of deer harvested during the opening weekend of the fall firearms deer season, Nov. 10 and 11, in and around counties where the disease has been recently found. MDC will again also offer voluntary CWD sampling during the entire fall and winter hunting season of deer harvested in and around counties where the disease has been recently found.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend hunters in areas known to have CWD test their deer before consuming the meat.

More information on specific counties, sampling locations, and requirements will be published in MDC’s “2018 Fall Deer & Turkey Hunting Regulations and Information” booklet, and online at mdc.mo.gov/cwd, starting in July.

MORE ON TARGETED CULLING

After the close of deer season, MDC staff work with landowners on a voluntary basis to cull additional deer within an area of 1 to 5 miles of where recent cases of CWD have been found. Collecting additional samples helps MDC scientists better understand how many deer in the area may be infected and where they are in the area. Targeted culling also helps limit the spread of CWD by removing potentially infected deer from an area.

“Targeted culling has proven to be very useful in finding cases of CWD and in reducing the spread of the disease by removing additional CWD-infected animals,” explained Batten. “We found about half of the new CWD cases this year through targeted culling. Without targeted culling, those 16 infected deer would have continued to spread the disease.”

She added that targeted culling is the only tested method of slowing the growth of CWD in a local deer population.

“The state of Illinois has been successful in stabilizing levels of CWD through the use of a sustained targeted culling program over many years,” Batten said. “In contrast, states such as Wisconsin that have not used targeted culling, or that have only implemented targeted culling for a short period of time, have seen levels of CWD climb steadily.”

Of the more than 101,000 deer MDC has tested for CWD since 2001, about 4,500 have been harvested through targeted culling, including 1,485 from the past season.

“This accounts for about 4% of all CWD samples collected so far, but has resulted in finding about 49% of CWD cases in Missouri,” Batten explained.

Learn more about targeted culling through this video: youtube.com/watch?v=7VitIahG5Do

For more information on CWD, visit mdc.mo.gov/cwd.

MDC reports 11 new cases of CWD in Missouri deer

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) reports that 11 new cases of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) have recently been found in deer harvested in Macon, Adair, and now Cole counties. A buck harvested near the village of Centertown in Cole County is the first case of the disease to be found outside of the Department’s six-county CWD Containment Zone of Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph, and Sullivan counties. All previous cases have been limited to Macon, Linn, and Adair counties.

These 11 new cases bring the total number of Missouri free-ranging deer that have tested positive for CWD to 14 for this past season and 24 overall since the disease was first discovered in the state in 2010 at a private hunting preserve in Linn County. CWD has also been found in 11 captive deer in Macon and Linn counties.

The Department has collected more than 43,000 tissue samples since it began testing for the emerging disease in 2001. MDC has collected more than 3,400 tissue samples for CWD testing from harvested and other free-ranging deer this season. Results for about 330 tissue samples are still in the process of being tested by an independent, outside laboratory.

“We will provide an update of final results once all testing has been completed for the season,” said MDC Deer Biologist Jason Sumners. “We will continue to monitor the spread of the disease through more CWD testing this coming fall and winter. We are also updating our efforts to help contain the spread of the disease and will be working out the details over this spring and summer.”

Chronic Wasting Disease infects only deer and other members of the deer family by causing degeneration of the brain. The disease has no vaccine or cure and is 100-percent fatal.

Missouri offers some of the best deer hunting in the country, and deer hunting is an important part of many Missourians’ lives and family traditions. Infectious diseases such as CWD could reduce hunting and wildlife-watching opportunities for Missouri’s nearly 520,000 deer hunters and almost two million wildlife watchers. Deer hunting is also an important economic driver in Missouri and gives a $1 billion annual boost to state and local economies.

Lower deer numbers from infectious diseases such as CWD could hurt 12,000 Missouri jobs and many businesses that rely on deer hunting as a significant source of revenue, such as meat processors, taxidermists, hotels, restaurants, sporting goods stores, and others. CWD also threatens the investments of thousands of private landowners who manage their land for deer and deer hunting, and who rely on deer and deer hunting to maintain property values.

For more information on CWD in Missouri, visit the MDC website.