CWD regulations in Nebraska

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Nebraska, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Nebraska can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Nebraska

Nebraska- University of Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center
University of Nebraska - Lincoln Fair Street and East Campus Loop Lincoln, NE 68583-0907
402-472-9416
www.vbms.unl.edu/nvdls.shtml

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 2/2016)

1. Arthur 2. Banner 3. Box Butte 4. Boone 5. Buffalo 6. Cherry 7. Cheyenne 8. Custer 9. Dawes 10. Deuel 11. Furnas 12. Garden 13. Grant 14. Hall 15. Harlan 16. Hitchcock 17. Holt 18. Hooker 19. Keith 20. Kimball 21. Lincoln 22. Loup 23. Morrill 24. Nance 25. Phelps 26.  Red Willow 27. Scotts Bluff 28. Sheridan 29. Sioux 30. Webster

 

Most Recent CWD News

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  • LINCOLN, Neb. – The presence of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer has been detected for the first time in the southwestern Nebraska counties of Chase, Dundy, Hayes, Frontier and Franklin, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

    The Commission conducted a CWD sampling operation

    Read More
  • LINCOLN, Neb. – Chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer has appeared for the first time in Buffalo, Custer and Holt counties, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

    There were 1,565 lymph node samples collected from deer taken during the 2011 November firearm deer season,

    Read More
    • 2
  • LINCOLN, Neb. – Testing of deer for chronic wasting disease (CWD) along the Kansas border produced negative test results.

    The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission in southern Red Willow County and the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks in northern Decatur County last month tested 63

    Read More
    • 2
  • LINCOLN, Neb. – More than 3,200 hunter-harvested deer and 44 elk were tested for chronic wasting disease (CWD) this fall, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

    “A total of 17 deer tested positive for the disease, and all but three of the positive tests

    Read More
    • 2
  • LINCOLN, Neb. – The number of Nebraska deer testing positive for chronic wasting disease fell for the second year in a row, although there is evidence the disease has expanded.

    Seventeen deer tested positive, out of a sample size of 5,841, for the disease in 2006,

    Read More
    • 2
  • Lincoln, Neb. -- The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission is asking deer hunters to again help monitor the status of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in the state.

    Bruce Trindle, a fish and wildlife specialist in the disease section of the Commissions wildlife division, said biologists hope

    Read More
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Category Archives: Nebraska

Nebraska – Sampling of deer results in 203 positives for CWD

LINCOLN, Neb. – The presence of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer has been detected for the first time in the southwestern Nebraska counties of Chase, Dundy, Hayes, Frontier and Franklin, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

The Commission conducted a CWD sampling operation in its Northwest and Southwest District deer check stations during the 2017 November firearm deer season.

There were 203 positives from 1,807 deer sampled primarily in the Frenchman, Platte, Republican, Pine Ridge, Upper Platte and Plains management units. Both whitetails and mule deer were sampled.

The goal of this sampling effort is to assess the spread and prevalence of the disease through periodic testing in each region of the state, which in turn helps biologists predict when and if future effects on deer numbers may occur. Testing will take place in regional locations of the state in the next several years.

Although present in Colorado and Wyoming for several decades, CWD was first discovered in Nebraska in 2000 in Kimball County. Since 1997, Commission staff have tested nearly 51,000 deer and found 499 that tested positive. CWD has been found in 40 Nebraska counties, but no population declines attributable to the disease have yet occurred.

CWD is prion disease that attacks the brain of an infected deer and elk, eventually causing emaciation, listlessness, excessive salivation and death. It is generally thought that CWD is transmitted from animal to animal through exchange of body fluids, but other modes of transmission may exist.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, no person is known to have contracted CWD; however, hunters should cautiously handle and process deer and avoid consuming animals that test positive or look sick. Livestock and other animals not in the deer family also do not appear susceptible to CWD.

Hunters can help prevent the spread of CWD by using proper carcass disposal methods. CWD prions, the infectious proteins that transmit the disease, can remain viable for months or even years in the soil. Hunters should field dress animals at the place of kill, avoid spreading spinal cord or brain tissue to meat, and to dispose of the head (brain), spinal column and other bones at a licensed landfill.

Learn more about CWD at OutdoorNebraska.gov/cwd/.

Contact information: Jerry Kane ([email protected]), 402-471-5008, news manager with the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

CWD Found in Buffalo, Custer, Holt Counties

LINCOLN, Neb. – Chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer has appeared for the first time in Buffalo, Custer and Holt counties, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

There were 1,565 lymph node samples collected from deer taken during the 2011 November firearm deer season, with 26 samples testing positive for CWD. In addition, samples were taken from 37 culled deer that showed clinical symptoms for CWD, with one male mule deer from Garden County testing positive. Those symptoms include a rough, emaciated appearance and a lack of fear of humans.

There were a record 51 positives from 3,645 samples in Nebraska in 2010. However, the surveillance effort was reduced in 2011 due to a lack of funds. The 2011 effort focused on central Nebraska, the leading edge of the disease as it spreads from west to east.

Game and Parks confirmed CWD in the state’s deer population in 2000. CWD is a disease that can affect deer and elk and always is fatal to the affected animal. Humans have never been known to contract CWD.

CWD Tests of Deer Along Kansas Border Negative

LINCOLN, Neb. – Testing of deer for chronic wasting disease (CWD) along the Kansas border produced negative test results.

The Nebraska Game and Parks Commission in southern Red Willow County and the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks in northern Decatur County last month tested 63 deer and found no CWD.

The study was initiated by a CWD-positive deer taken by a Nebraska hunter last November along Beaver Creek near Marion in Red Willow County and three CWD-positive deer taken by Kansas hunters along Sappa Creek in Decatur County in northwest Kansas.

“In response to the CWD positives that were detected during the Nebraska and Kansas firearm deer seasons, it was important to attempt to determine the infection rate of deer in this area,” said the Commission’s Brian Perks, a southwest district wildlife biologist.

On Feb. 11-12, Nebraska biologists harvested 29 deer near Beaver Creek between Lebanon, Neb., and the Kansas state line, while officials in Kansas harvested 34 deer along Sappa Creek in Decatur County. All of the deer from both states tested negative.

Perks said that because white-tailed deer are very mobile, it is probable that deer travel back and forth between the Beaver and Sappa Creek drainages, and the occurrences of CWD in the two drainages likely are linked.

CWD surveillance in Nebraska began in 2000. To date, 32,998 deer have been tested as a result of tissue collections from hunter-harvested deer. Also, biologists have tested numerous deer from disease study projects in other areas of the state and from reports of sick deer investigations. Since surveillance began, 133 deer have tested positive for CWD statewide. Perks said the Beaver Creek incidence was the first case of CWD detected in southwest Nebraska. He said other positives have been confined to the northwest region of the state with the exception of two isolated cases near Grand Island.

“Biologists cannot predict the long-term impact CWD will have in southwest Nebraska,” Perks said. “We expect that CWD will be detected in the Beaver Creek area again, but research indicates that CWD occurs in less than one percent of Nebraska’s deer population.”

Perks said biologists are using the best information available to manage this disease. “We plan to continue CWD surveillance through voluntary tissue collections at game check stations during firearm deer season and will investigate all sick animal reports.”

Perks said landowners are encouraged to report to the Commission deer appearing sick or exhibiting abnormal behavior.

Deer, Elk Tested for CWD

LINCOLN, Neb. – More than 3,200 hunter-harvested deer and 44 elk were tested for chronic wasting disease (CWD) this fall, according to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

“A total of 17 deer tested positive for the disease, and all but three of the positive tests were from deer harvested within the endemic area in the Panhandle,” said Bruce Trindle, Commission wildlife disease specialist. “ None of the elk tested positive.”

The deer were taken during the November firearm season. Elk season ended Oct. 28 for all units except Boyd.

CWD is a disease that can affect deer and elk and is always fatal to the affected animal. Humans have never been known to contract CWD.

The three deer that tested positive outside the Panhandle were white-tailed deer. A firearm hunter in Keith County shot one of the afflicted deer a few miles west of Ogallala on the South Platte River. The second was shot in Red Willow County on the Beaver Creek drainage near the Kansas border, and the third positive was harvested in Hall County a few miles south of Alda.

Biologists will sample more deer from the areas where the disease had not previously been detected. Additional samples will help indicate the prevalence of CWD within those immediate harvest locations.

“The prevalence of CWD in deer tested over the past three years has been less than one percent, and the distribution of the disease has expanded very slowly,” Trindle said.

The Commission confirmed CWD in the states deer population in 2000. To date, there have been 133 free-ranging deer that tested positive for CWD through the Commissions surveillance program, which has sampled more than 33,000 deer.

CWD has never been detected in the Nebraska wild elk population.

The Commission plans on continuing its diligent testing of Nebraskas deer herds for this disease.

Number of Positive CWD Tests Drops Again

LINCOLN, Neb. – The number of Nebraska deer testing positive for chronic wasting disease fell for the second year in a row, although there is evidence the disease has expanded.

Seventeen deer tested positive, out of a sample size of 5,841, for the disease in 2006, according to Bruce Trindle, fish and wildlife specialist for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission’s Norfolk office. The state, which began sampling deer in 1997, had a high of 33 positive tests in 2004 and 19 the following year.

Three positive tests came from deer taken in northeastern Cherry County, where there had been one positive in 2004. Of the 114 positive tests statewide since the program began, most have come from deer taken in Panhandle counties.

However, some areas that have had a concentration of positive tests since the program began – such as northern Sioux County and the southwestern Panhandle counties of Scotts Bluff, Banner and Kimball – showed just one positive test among them.

“We are encouraged by the lack of positives in areas where there have been concentrations in previous years,” Trindle said. “This does not mean the disease is being controlled in these areas, but more that the frequency is remaining low.”

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a disease that attacks the central nervous system and causes fatal damage to the brains of white-tailed deer, mule deer, moose and elk.

CWD is a prion disease similar to mad cow disease. A prion is a mutated protein in the body that causes other normal proteins to fold abnormally and cause sponge-like holes in the brain.

CWD is transmitted from animal to animal, probably through body fluids such as feces, urine, or saliva. Animals that are crowded or confined have a greater chance of encountering the body fluids of other animals and, therefore, a higher likelihood of becoming infected if the rogue prion is present. Animals that have a social system that includes close contact with herd mates also may have a higher chance of becoming infected. Recent research indicates that CWD prions can survive in the environment after infected and exposed animals are removed. CWD is not known to affect humans.

Here’s a breakdown of the 17 positives tests in Nebraska last year: hunted mule deer, nine; hunted white-tailed deer, six; culled mule deer, two.

Deer testing positive came from the following counties: Sheridan (seven), Dawes (four), northeastern Cherry (three), Cheyenne (one), Sioux (one), and Box Butte (one).

Trindle said the successful testing program is possible only because of the hunters who voluntarily allowed their deer to be tested.

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