CWD regulations in Texas

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Texas, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Texas can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Texas

Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory
Texas A & M University 1 Sippel Rd. College Station, TX 77843
979-845-3414 or 888-646-5623
tvmdlweb.tamu.edu/

Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory
Texas A & M University 6610 Amarillo Blvd West Amarillo, TX 79106
806-353-7478
http://tvmdlweb.tamu.edu/

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (Accurate as of 3/2018)

1. Dallam 2. El Paso 3. Hudspeth 4. Hartley 5. Lavaca 6. Medina 7. Uvalde 

Most Recent CWD News

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  • Action Taken in Response to Disease Discovery in Roadkill Whitetail Deer AUSTIN – The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has approved expansion of the state’s chronic wasting disease (CWD) Panhandle Containment Zone following the discovery of the disease earlier this year in a roadkill white-tailed deer.
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  • AUSTIN – Two new cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Texas captive deer, including the first confirmed from a live test tonsillar biopsy sample, have been validated. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) and Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) are conducting an epidemiological investigation

    Read More
  • AUSTIN – A free-ranging mule deer buck, harvested in Hartley County, has been confirmed positive for CWD. State officials received confirmation today from the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa.

    Hartley County is located in the Texas Panhandle immediately to the south of Dalhart

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  • AUSTIN – A 3 1/2-year-old captive raised white-tailed buck harvested in early January by a hunter from a release site on a ranch in Medina and Uvalde counties has been confirmed positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD). The deer’s origin has been identified as an onsite

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  • SAN ANTONIO (AP) -- A fourth case of chronic wasting disease has been confirmed in deer in South Texas.

    The San Antonio Express-News reported Friday that the latest infected deer was raised in Medina County at the same ranch as the other three animals. That's prompted

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  • AUSTIN – A two-year-old white-tailed deer in a Medina County deer breeding facility has been confirmed positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). This is the first case of CWD detected in captive white-tailed deer in Texas. CWD was first detected in Texas in 2012 in free-ranging

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Category Archives: Texas

Chronic Wasting Disease Detected in Medina County Captive Deer

AUSTIN – A two-year-old white-tailed deer in a Medina County deer breeding facility has been confirmed positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). This is the first case of CWD detected in captive white-tailed deer in Texas. CWD was first detected in Texas in 2012 in free-ranging mule deer in the Hueco Mountains in far West Texas.

The Medina County tissue samples submitted by the breeder facility in early June as part of routine deer mortality surveillance revealed the presence of CWD during testing at the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory (TVMDL) in College Station. The National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed the findings on Tuesday, June 30.

An epidemiological investigation to determine the extent of the disease, assess risks to Texas’ free ranging deer and protect the captive deer and elk breeding industry is being led by the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), in coordination with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) and U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Veterinary Services (USDA/APHIS/VS).

Officials have taken immediate action to secure all cervids at the Medina County breeder facility with plans to conduct additional investigation for CWD. In addition, those breeder facilities that have received deer from the Medina County facility or shipped deer to that facility during the last two years are under movement restrictions and cannot move or release cervids at this time. TPWD is disallowing liberation of captive deer from all breeder facilities into the wild at this time pending further review. Additional measures to further minimize risk of CWD spreading into Texas’ free-ranging white-tailed deer herd, and to protect the captive deer breeding industry, will be considered.

“This is a terribly unfortunate development that we are committed to addressing as proactively, comprehensively, and expeditiously as possible. The health of our state’s wild and captive deer herds, as well as affiliated hunting, wildlife, and rural based economies, are vitally important to Texas hunters, communities, and landowners. As such, our primary objectives are to determine the source of the disease and to identify other deer breeding facilities and release sites that may have received deer from affected facilities,” said Carter Smith, TPWD Executive Director. “Working collaboratively with experts in the field we have developed protocols to address CWD, and our implementation efforts are already well under way.”

The TPWD and the TAHC CWD Management Plan will guide the State’s response to this incident. The plan was developed by the State’s CWD Task Force, which is comprised of deer and elk breeders, wildlife biologists, veterinarians and other animal-health experts from TPWD, TAHC, TVMDL, Department of State Health Services, Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, and USDA.

Since 2002, the state has conducted surveillance throughout Texas for the disease. More than 34,000 samples collected from hunter-harvested and road kill deer have been tested for CWD.

Although animal health and wildlife officials cannot say how long or to what extent the disease has been present in the Medina County deer breeding facility, the breeder has had an active CWD surveillance program since 2006 with no positives detected until now.

“We are working with experts at the local, state and federal level, to determine the extent of this disease, and respond appropriately to limit further transmission,” said Dr. Andy Schwartz, TAHC Epidemiologist and Assistant Executive Director. “Strong public awareness and the continued support of the cervid industry is paramount to the success of controlling CWD in Texas.”

The disease was first recognized in 1967 in captive mule deer in Colorado. CWD has also been documented in captive and/or free-ranging deer in 23 states and 2 Canadian provinces. CWD among cervids is a progressive, fatal disease that commonly results in altered behavior as a result of microscopic changes made to the brain of affected animals. An animal may carry the disease for years without outward indication, but in the latter stages, signs may include listlessness, lowering of the head, weight loss, repetitive walking in set patterns, and a lack of responsiveness. To date there is no evidence that CWD poses a risk to humans or non-cervids. However, as a precaution, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization recommend not to consume meat from infected animals.

No New Positives Found in 2013-14 Trans Pecos CWD Surveillance

AUSTIN – Nearly 300 tissue samples were collected from hunter harvested deer and elk from the Trans Pecos ecoregion during the 2013-14 season to test for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). Over the last two hunting seasons upwards of 600 deer and elk have been tested for CWD, thanks to the cooperation of hunters and landowners who have participated in the state’s hunter check stations.

“Undoubtedly without the hunter check stations, and hunter and landowner participation, we would know very little about the prevalence of the disease or where it exists,” said Mitch Lockwood, Big Game Program Director with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

To date, 617 deer and elk have been tested through the CWD check stations and strategic sampling that occurred during the summer of 2012; 215 were in the Containment Zone, 172 were in the adjacent High Risk Zone, 57 were in the Buffer Zone, and 173 were outside of the CWD zones. Forty five of the samples tested from the Containment Zone were from deer harvested in the Hueco Mountains.

TPWD’s Current CWD Management Zones

“Additional sampling is necessary to develop more confidence in the geographic extent and prevalence of the disease, but the fact that CWD has not been detected in Texas outside of the Hueco Mountains of northern El Paso and Hudspeth counties is encouraging,” said Lockwood.

Including the positives reported from last year’s sampling effort, and the three positives reported by New Mexico Game and Fish in 2012, CWD has been detected in 9 of 49 deer sampled in the Hueco Mountains.

CWD is a member of the group of diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Other diseases in this group include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) in cattle, and Cruetzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. CWD among cervids is a progressive, fatal disease that commonly results in altered behavior as a result of microscopic changes made to the brain of affected animals. An animal may carry the disease for years without outward indication, but in the latter stages, signs may include listlessness, lowering of the head, weight loss, repetitive walking in set patterns, and a lack of responsiveness. CWD is not known to affect humans or livestock.

There is no vaccine or cure for CWD, but steps have been taken to minimize the risk of the disease spreading from beyond the area where it currently exists. TPWD and Texas Animal Health commissions adopted rules to restrict movement of deer, elk, and other susceptible species within or from the CWD Zones as well increase surveillance efforts.

More information about CWD is available online.

TAHC Adopts Chronic Wasting Disease Rule

The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) held a regularly scheduled meeting on September 10, 2013. The Commission adopted five rules. One of the rules adopted was Chapter 40, Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), Herd Certification.

Chapter 40, Chronic Wasting Disease, Herd Certification: The amendments remove the requirement for a specific fence height, change herd inventory requirements to allow verification through means other than a hands-on process, and change the requirement for submission of samples in positive or suspected positive herds to mortalities of any age. For regular enrolled herds the required sampling age remains at 12 months.

With the change in test age requirement for certain herds, the Texas CWD Herd Certification Program fully meets federal requirements for interstate movement of CWD susceptible species. The TAHC is working with key federal personnel to upgrade Texas from Provisional Approved Status to Approved Status, with no interruptions in interstate commerce expected.

A detailed explanation of the rule is available on the TAHC web site. The aforementioned TAHC rule will go into effect on Monday, October 7, 2013.

For more information regarding this rule or general information about CWD, contact your local region office or call 1-800-550-8242.

Founded in 1893, the Texas Animal Health Commission works to protect the health of all Texas livestock, including: cattle, swine, poultry, sheep, goats, equine animals, and exotic livestock.

TAHC Proposes Modifications to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), Fever Tick and Swine Pseudorabies Rules

AUSTIN – The Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) is accepting comments on rules proposed at the January 15, 2013, Commission meeting. The proposals are to amend Chapter 40, entitled “Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)”, Chapter 41, entitled “Fever Ticks”, and Chapter 55, entitled “Swine”. These rules are published in the Texas Register with a comment period of 30 days. The comment period for these proposals ends on Monday, March 4, 2013, at 5:00 p.m.

The proposed amendment to Chapter 40 “Chronic Wasting Disease” is to repeal and replace Section 40.5 “Elk Testing Requirements” with a new Section 40.5 “Movement Requirements for CWD Susceptible Species”. The purpose of this rule is to revise the current surveillance requirements for intrastate movement of elk to include red deer and Sika deer. The rule as proposed will require that these susceptible species participate in the program and test 20% of all mortalities. For this program, the test age is set at 16 months and resembles the program administered by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s white-tail deer breeder program.

The proposed amendment to Chapter 41 “Fever Ticks” is for Section 41.9 “Vacation and Inspection of a Premise”. This amendment will add a requirement that all cattle in the Permanent Quarantine Zone be identified with permanent official identification and be presented annually for inspection.

The proposed amendment to Chapter 55 “Swine” is for Section 55.5 “Pseudorabies”. This amendment is to update the testing timeframe for releasing swine that have been quarantined for exposure to Pseudorabies. This is in accordance with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services’ National Pseudorabies Eradication Program. The current rule requires swine to have two consecutive negative herd tests not less than 60 days from the removal of the last reactor. The changes proposed to Section 55.5 will now allow swine to be released from quarantine with one negative herd test not less than 30 days from removal of the last reactor. “The TAHC is committed to making each of these programs successful. Our ultimate goal is to enhance and ensure Texas’ livestock and poultry marketability,” said Dr. Dee Ellis, TAHC Executive Director and State Veterinarian.

A detailed explanation of the three rule proposals is available on the TAHC web site.

The TAHC rule proposals have a comment period of 30 days. The TAHC encourages and appreciates all comments. Comments on the proposed regulations must be submitted in writing to Carol Pivonka, Texas Animal Health Commission, 2105 Kramer Lane, Austin, Texas 78758, by fax at (512) 719-0721, or by email. The deadline for comment submissions is Monday, March 4, 2013, at 5:00 p.m.

For more information, visit www.tahc.texas.gov or call 1-800-550-8242.

Founded in 1893, the Texas Animal Health Commission works to protect the health of all Texas livestock, including: cattle, swine, poultry, sheep, goats, equine animals, and exotic livestock.

Four New Positives Found in Trans Pecos CWD Surveillance

Disease not discovered outside Containment Zone

AUSTIN – Nearly 300 tissue samples were collected from hunter harvested mule deer from the Trans Pecos ecoregion of far West Texas during the 2012-13 season for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing. Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory and National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) have confirmed CWD in four of those samples. All CWD-positive deer were harvested within the CWD Containment Zone.

Of 298 deer sampled during hunting season, 107 were harvested in the Containment Zone, 93 were harvested in the adjacent High Risk Zone, 25 were harvested in the Buffer Zone, and 73 deer were harvested outside of the CWD zones. Nineteen of the samples collected from the Containment Zone were from deer harvested in the Hueco Mountains.

“The good news is that CWD has not been detected in Texas outside of the Hueco Mountains of northern El Paso and Hudspeth counties,” said Mitch Lockwood, Big Game Program Director with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Including the two positives reported from TPWD’s strategic sampling effort last summer, and the three positives reported by New Mexico Game and Fish last year, CWD has been detected in 9 of 31 deer sampled in the Hueco Mountains.

CWD is a member of the group of diseases called transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Other diseases in this group include scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or mad cow disease) in cattle, and Cruetzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. CWD among cervids is a progressive, fatal disease that commonly results in altered behavior as a result of microscopic changes made to the brain of affected animals. An animal may carry the disease for years without outward indication, but in the latter stages, signs may include listlessness, lowering of the head, weight loss, repetitive walking in set patterns, and a lack of responsiveness. CWD is not known to affect humans.

There is no vaccine or cure for CWD, but steps have been taken to minimize the risk of the disease spreading from beyond the area where it currently exists. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission and Texas Animal Health Commission adopted rules restricting movement of deer, elk, and other susceptible species within or from the CWD Zones, and enhancing surveillance efforts.

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