CWD regulations in Wisconsin

Due to the regular amending of regulations in Wisconsin, it is recommended that before hunting you check these CWD regulations, as well as those of any other states or provinces in which you will be hunting or traveling through while transporting cervid carcasses. The contact information for Wisconsin can be seen below:

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FOR NATIONAL REGULATIONS GO HERE

Testing Laboratories in Wisconsin

Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
6101 Mineral Point Rd. Madison WI 53705-4494
608-262-5432 or 800-608-8387
http://www.wvdl.wisc.edu/

Locations Where CWD Was Found

Counties (accurate as of March 2018)

 Adams, Columbia, Crawford, Dane, Dodge, Grant, Green, Iowa, Jefferson, Juneau, Kenosha,  Lafayette, Lincoln, Milwaukee, Portage, Racine, Richland, Rock, Sauk, Walworth, Washburn, Washington, Waukesha, Vernon

 

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Category Archives: Wisconsin

WI – Baiting and feeding ban renewed in Oneida County following new CWD detection

MADISON – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has confirmed that a wild deer has tested positive for chronic wasting disease in Oneida County, in the Crescent Township.

As required by law, this finding will renew Oneida County’s existing baiting and feeding ban for another three years. Additionally, this positive will renew the two-year baiting and feeding ban in Langlade County.

The CWD-positive one-year-old doe was harvested on a disease surveillance permit issued within a 10-mile radius of the recent Lincoln County positive detection. This is Oneida County’s first CWD-positive wild deer.

“This Oneida County detection is a direct result of our surveillance efforts put in place in response to the Lincoln CWD positive,” said Eric Lobner, DNR Bureau Director for the Wildlife Management program. “We will continue to work with local communities to promote CWD surveillance and awareness in the area.”

In response to the detection of this new CWD positive deer, the department will take the following steps:

Continue to work with the local County Deer Advisory Council members in disease surveillance around this positive location.
Conduct surveillance activities to assess disease distribution and prevalence including:
Encourage reporting of sick deer
Sample vehicle-killed adult deer
Sample adult deer harvested under agricultural damage permits
Sample adult deer harvested under urban deer hunts in the area
Establish additional CWD sampling locations prior to the 2018 deer seasons.
These actions are very important for assessing the potential geographic distribution of the disease and if other animals in proximity to the new positive test are infected.

As has been demonstrated in the past in other parts of the state, local citizen involvement in the decision-making process as well as management actions to address this CWD detection will have the greatest potential for success.

For more information regarding baiting and feeding regulations and CWD in Wisconsin, and how to have adult deer tested during the 2018/2019 hunting seasons, visit the department’s website, dnr.wi.gov, and search “bait and feeding” and “CWD sampling” respectively. To report a sick deer on the landscape, search keywords “sick deer” or contact a local wildlife biologist.

Last Revised: Friday, April 20, 2018

WI – CWD detection in a wild deer in Eau Claire County will result in a renewal of the baiting and feeding ban

Contact(s): Bill Hogseth, wildlife biologist for Eau Claire and Chippewa counties, 715-839-3771

MADISON – The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has confirmed that a wild deer has tested positive for chronic wasting disease in western Eau Claire County, near the town of Brunswick.

As required by law, this finding will renew Eau Claire County’s existing three-year baiting and feeding ban, effective May 1, 2018. Because this new CWD-positive result is located within 10 miles of Buffalo, Chippewa, Dunn, Pepin and Trempealeau counties, these counties will now be designated as CWD-affected counties. Additionally, two-year baiting and feeding bans for these five counties will be enacted on May 1.

The department collected a two-year-old doe in response to a sick deer call from a landowner and submitted samples for testing. This CWD positive animal is the first confirmed wild deer to test positive for the disease in Eau Claire County.

“While this latest detection is disheartening and is certainly cause for concern in Eau Claire and the surrounding counties, it demonstrates the importance of local involvement in our monitoring efforts,” said DNR Secretary Dan Meyer. “Receiving the sick deer call from this concerned landowner allowed us to apply our sick deer response protocol and respond quickly to investigate a potential new CWD detection.

In response to the detection of this new CWD positive deer, the department will take the following steps to respond::

Convene a meeting with the local County Deer Advisory Council members from the 6 counties impacted by this detection to decide on future management actions specific to this detection.
Establish a 10-mile radius disease surveillance area around this positive location
Conduct surveillance activities to assess disease distribution and prevalence including:
Encourage reporting of sick deer
Sample vehicle-killed adult deer
Sample adult deer harvested under agricultural damage permits
Sample adult deer harvested under urban deer hunts in the area
Establish additional CWD sampling locations prior to the 2018 deer seasons
These actions are very important for assessing the potential geographic distribution of the disease and if other animals in proximity to the new positive test are infected.

As has been demonstrated in the past in other parts of the state, local citizen involvement in the decision-making process as well as management actions to address this CWD detection will have the greatest potential for success.

For more information regarding baiting and feeding regulations and CWD in Wisconsin, and how to have adult deer tested during the 2018/2019 hunting seasons, visit the department’s website, dnr.wi.gov, and search “bait and feeding” and “CWD sampling” respectively. To report a sick deer on the landscape, search keywords “sick deer” or contact a local wildlife biologist.

Last Revised: Wednesday, April 18, 2018

WI – CWD-Positive Deer Found on Washington County Farm

Release Date: March 8, 2018

Media Contact: Bill Cosh, Communications Director, 608-224-5020, [email protected]

MADISON – A white-tailed deer from a breeding farm in Washington County has tested positive for chronic wasting disease (CWD), Wisconsin State Veterinarian Dr. Paul McGraw announced today. The National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, confirmed the test results.

The buck was born on the 15-acre farm in May 2015. It was part of a herd of 58 whitetails, along with 13 elk, according to the owner’s most recent registration. The owner found it dead from injuries apparently sustained in a fight. The deer had previously appeared healthy. It was sampled in accordance with Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) rules, which require testing of farm-raised deer and elk when they die or are killed.

The farm has been enrolled in the CWD Herd Status Program since 2003. All deer from herds enrolled in the CWD Herd Status Program must be tested for CWD if they die or are killed on the farm.

The farm has been quarantined, an automatic action upon a positive CWD test, which stops movement of deer off the premises. DATCP’s Animal Health Division will investigate the animal’s history and trace movements of deer onto and off the farm to determine whether other herds may have been exposed to the CWD-positive deer.

Article can be found here https://datcp.wi.gov/Pages/News_Media/20180308CWDPositiveWashingtonCounty.aspx

Wisconsin – First CWD detection in Lincoln County will result in baiting and feeding ban in Lincoln and Langlade Counties

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has received confirmation that a wild deer has tested positive for chronic wasting disease in northeast Lincoln County, south of Rhinelander.

As required by law, this finding will establish baiting and feeding bans for Lincoln and Langlade counties effective Feb. 1, 2018. The ban for Lincoln County will be enacted for three years. Langlade County is within 10 miles of the Lincoln County positive wild deer, and due to being adjacent to a county with a CWD positive test result, a two-year ban will be enacted. Oneida county is already under baiting and feeding bans and those bans will be renewed with this newest detection.

The two-year-old buck harvested in northeast Lincoln County is the first confirmed positive deer in this county.

“This latest discovery is troublesome and is something we take very seriously,” said DNR Secretary Dan Meyer. “We will start a dialogue with the local community through the County Deer Advisory Council on what steps should be taken next. While there is no silver bullet remedy to eradicate CWD, we have learned from experience that having the local community involved is a key factor in managing this disease.”

The DNR will also take the following steps:

• Establish a 10-mile radius disease surveillance area around this positive location

• Conduct surveillance activities to assess disease distribution and prevalence including:

◦ Encourage reporting of sick deer

◦ Sample vehicle-killed adult deer

◦ Sample adult deer harvested under agricultural damage permits

◦ Sample adult deer harvested under urban deer hunts in the area

• Establish additional CWD sampling locations prior to the 2018 deer seasons

These actions are a very important next step in further understanding the potential geographic distribution of the disease and if other animals are infected within Wisconsin’s deer herd in the area.

As has been demonstrated in the past in other parts of the state, local citizen involvement in the decision-making process as well as management actions to address this CWD detection will have the greatest potential for success.

For more information regarding baiting and feeding regulations and CWD in Wisconsin, and how to have adult deer tested during the 2018/2019 hunting seasons, visit the department’s website, dnr.wi.gov, and search “bait and feeding” and “CWD sampling” respectively.

Oconto County Deer Tests Positive for CWD

A white-tailed deer on an Oconto County hunting preserve has tested positive for chronic wasting disease. The National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, reported the final test results last week.

State Veterinarian Dr. Paul McGraw says the animal was an 18 month old female and was one of more than an estimated 1,450 deer in the 1,360-acre preserve. The deer was born on the premises and killed on the preserve.

More than 1,000 deer from this preserve have been tested for CWD since 2010.

The DATCP animal health division’s investigation will look at animal movement records, but since the deer was born on the preserve, there will not be any trace back investigations of any other herds.

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